Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
6 août 2013 2 06 /08 /août /2013 15:08
Jusqu’à 6 mois, l’allaitement maternel est recommandé. Après 6 mois, le statut martial des enfants au sein dépend des aliments de diversification en raison des taux bas en fer du lait maternel. L’enrichissement en fer des aliments peut constituer une option pour compenser la carence. Néanmoins, l’efficacité de cette compensation dépend du taux d’absorption du fer qui est bas avec la plupart des aliments. D’autre part, les aliments consommés modulent la flore intestinale. Cette flore joue un rôle important dans le développement du système immunitaire et sa composition dépend étroitement du type d’alimentation. Aux USA, où la supplémentation des aliments pour nourrisson est fréquente, une étude a été conduite pour évaluer les effets de cette mesure sur le statut en fer et sur la flore intestinale de nourrissons normaux sous lait maternel de 6 à 9 mois, sans autre apport lacté. Au total, 45 enfants ont reçu par tirage au sort 3 formules différentes de complément : 1°des céréales pour nourrissons supplémentées en fer et zinc (CFZ), 2° des céréales supplémentées en fer uniquement (CF), 3° de la viande en pot (V). Les légumes, fruits et biscuits étaient autorisés à volonté car leurs apports en fer sont faibles. Les apports en fer ont été calculés tous les mois par des diététiciens et le taux de fer dosé dans les aliments de supplémentation. Le statut en fer a été évalué sur les dosages de ferritine, de CRP et du récepteur de la transferrine soluble (sTfR). L’étude de la flore fécale a été faite tous les mois de 5 à 9 mois chez 14 nourrissons par séquençage de l’ARN ribosomal des bactéries. Les enfants des groupes céréales avaient à 9 mois des apports en fer 2 à 3 fois supérieurs à ceux du groupe viande : groupe CFZ : 1 mg/kg/jour ; groupe CF : 1,5 mg/kg/j ; groupe V : 0,39 en moyenne (p < 0,0001). A 9 mois, 27 % des nourrissons avaient une ferritine basse (< 15 μg/l), 36 % une anémie modérée (Hb < 11,5 g/dl), sans différence selon le régime, 37 % une élévation de la sTfR (22 % dans les groupes céréales, et 64 % dans le groupe viande). Par ailleurs, les apports en fer n’étaient pas corrélés avec le taux de ferritine. La flore fécale des 14 enfants montrait une variabilité interindividuelle importante avant toute supplémentation. L’étude séquentielle a révélé des différences importantes selon les régimes, et en fonction du temps, en ce qui concerne l’abondance de plusieurs groupes bactériens, en particulier une augmentation significative du Clostridium du groupe XIVa producteur de butyrate chez les nourrissons qui consommaient de la viande, en comparaison des consommateurs de farine. Cette différence peut être attribuée au fer non absorbé des céréales. La supplémentation en fer n’a pas augmenté la densité des entérobactéries pathogènes quel que soit le régime. En conclusion, un pourcentage notable des nourrissons sains de plus de 6 mois sous allaitement maternel sont déficitaires en fer. La supplémentation modifie la flore intestinale. JJ Baudon 06/08/2013 Krebs NF et coll.: Effects of different complementary feeding regimens on iron status and enteric microbiota in breastfed infants. J Pediatr 2013 ; 163 : 416-23.
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
5 août 2013 1 05 /08 /août /2013 21:49
Research Highlight

Acta Pharmacologica Sinica (2013) 34: 989–990; doi: 10.1038/aps.2013.102

Acta Pharmacologica Sinica (2013) 34: 989–990; doi: 10.1038/aps.2013.102

Treating liver cancer with antibiotics?

Hui Mao1, Xue-zhu Feng1 and Shou-hong Guang1

1School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, China

Correspondence: Prof Shou-hong Guang, sguang@ustc.edu.cn

Obesity is one of the most prevalent health concerns over the past few decades. Besides diabetes and cardiovascular disease, obesity is also connected to multiple types of cancers1,2. However, the mechanism underlying obesity-related cancers is unclear. Previous research found that obesity alters the microbiota grown in the gastrointestinal tract3, where the microbes produce inflammatory metabolites4. And obesity-induced inflammation is involved in liver cancer5. Recently, Yoshimoto et al uncovered the missing link, by which obesity promotes the production of pro-inflammatory and carcinogenic bile acids via shaping gut microbiota, and leads to hepatic inflammation and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)6 (Figure 1).

Figure 1.

Model of obesity-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. Obesity or high-fat diet increases the production of deoxycholic acid (DCA), which provokes senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in hepatic stellar cells (HSCs). SASP leads to the secretion of numerous inflammatory and tumor promoting factors, and subsequently HCC development in the liver in obese mice.

Full figure and legend (21K)
Download Power Point slide (166 KB)

In mammals, bile acids are secreted into the gut lumen in high millimolar concentrations. They are converted to various secondary bile acids by microbes that are most densely colonized in the distal gut7. Secondary bile acids, including deoxycholic acid (DCA), are uptake by enterohepatic circulation to the liver. Feeding mice with high-fat diet (HFD) raised serum levels of DCA, whereas antibiotic treatment reduced the DCA levels6. Yoshimoto and colleagues found that feeding mice with HFD dramatically increased the percentage of Gram-positive bacteria in the intestinal tract. In particular, strains belonging to Clostridium cluster XI were substantially increased by HFD. These strains are essential to perform 7α-dehydroxylation that converts primary bile acids to DCA.

DCA causes DNA damage and is involved in the progression of colorectal cancers. In response to DNA damage, cells either age by senescence or self-destruct via apoptosis if the damage cannot be easily repaired. Although senescent cells can launch the cell-cycle arrest and halt cell replication, they remain metabolically active, and change gene expression, produce pro-inflammatory signaling proteins. In hepatic stellar cells (HSCs), DCA provokes the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), by which cells release several pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, tissue-remodeling enzymes, and tumor-promoting factors in the liver8,9. SASP plays essential roles in promoting the obesity-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in mice after exposure to chemical carcinogens that cause DNA damage8,10. On the other hand, a lack of SASP inducer or depletion of senescent HSCs can efficiently prevent the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in obese mice6. IL-1β is an upstream regulator of SASP, and is induced in senescent HSCs by HFD. Mice lacking the IL-1β gene reduced the expression of SASP factors in activated HSCs. Meanwhile, the number and size of liver tumors are significantly decreased in IL-1β−/− mice. These findings in mice can be extended to human beings. Adding recombinant IL-1β to cultured primary human HSCs induced the expression of IL-6 and IL-8. The signs of cellular senescence and SASP were also observed in HSCs in HCC in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis patients.

Notably, Yoshimoto and colleagues revealed several lines of evidence that blocking DCA production efficiently prevents the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma in obese mice: (1) treating mice with the oral antibiotic cocktail or vancomycin to kill Gram-positive bacteria led to a pronounced reduction of liver cancer; (2) supplementing antibiotics-treated animals with DCA promoted carcinogenesis; (3) the expression of baiJ gene, which is involved in 7α-dehydroxylation of bile acids, was drastically increased in mice fed HFD, albeit it was reduced by vancomycin. These findings provide valuable insight into the mechanism of obesity-related liver cancer and open up new possibilities for control of HCC.

It is worth noticing that residual hepatocellular carcinoma still exists after the ablation of HSCs by antibiotic treatment. Moreover, in contrast to Yoshimoto's work, intestinal Gram-negative, but not Gram-positive, bacteria have been reported to promote HCC development when induced by a different carcinogen in obese mice. Senescence induction has also been shown to inhibit the growth of several carcinoma cell lines. Therefore, further study of the molecular mechanisms linking gut microbial metabolites to SASP is required for the battle against obesity-associated HCC.

Bile acids have been implicated in a variety of human diseases, but how microbe influences bile acids metabolism is not clarified. Moreover, the by-products are not only passive carcinogens, but also active signaling molecules, which regulate host lipid and glucose homeostasis, as well as the synthesis of the bile acids themselves. Therefore, it is intriguing to elucidate the metabolism, functions, and regulations of bile acids. Gut microbiota plays important roles in many essential processes, including vitamin and amino acid biosynthesis, dietary energy harvest, and immune development. Numerous factors are able to change the gut microbial community, including diet, disease, and antibiotics, yet the health implications in human are unclear. Developing innovative technologies to systematically characterize the composition of gut bile acids could enable us to better understand the host-microbe interactions and the association with human diseases, for example, obesity and cancer7. Yoshimoto and colleagues' work paved a new way to study microbial metabolism and tumor microenvironment, as well as risk assessment, diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.

Top of page
References
Calle EE, Kaaks R. Overweight, obesity and cancer: epidemiological evidence and proposed mechanisms. Nat Rev Cancer 2004; 4: 579–91. | Article | PubMed | ISI | CAS |
Khandekar MJ, Cohen P, Spiegelman BM. Molecular mechanisms of cancer development in obesity. Nat Rev Cancer 2011; 11: 886–95. | Article | PubMed | CAS |
Greenblum S, Turnbaugh PJ, Borenstein E. Metagenomic systems biology of the human gut microbiome reveals topological shifts associated with obesity and inflammatory bowel disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2012; 109: 594–9. | Article | PubMed |
Fei N, Zhao L. An opportunistic pathogen isolated from the gut of an obese human causes obesity in germfree mice. ISME J 2013; 7: 880–4. | Article | PubMed | CAS |
Sun B, Karin M. Obesity, inflammation, and liver cancer. J Hepatol 2012; 56: 704–13. | Article | PubMed | CAS |
Yoshimoto S, Loo TM, Atarashi K, Kanda H, Sato S, Oyadomari S, et al. Obesity-induced gut microbial metabolite promotes liver cancer through senescence secretome. Nature 2013; 499: 97–101. | Article | PubMed |
Ridlon JM, Kang DJ, Hylemon PB. Bile salt biotransformations by human intestinal bacteria. J Lipid Res 2006; 47: 241–59. | Article | PubMed | ISI | CAS |
Kuilman T, Peeper DS. Senescence-messaging secretome: SMS-ing cellular stress. Nat Rev Cancer 2009; 9: 81–94. | Article | PubMed | ISI | CAS |
Friedman SL. Hepatic stellate cells: protean, multifunctional, and enigmatic cells of the liver. Physiol Rev 2008; 88: 125–72. | Article | PubMed | ISI | CAS |
Collado M, Serrano M. Senescence in tumours: evidence from mice and humans. Nat Rev Cancer 2010; 10: 51–7.?

Hui Mao1, Xue-zhu Feng1 and Shou-hong Guang1

1School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027, China

Correspondence: Prof Shou-hong Guang, sguang@ustc.edu.cn

Obesity is one of the most prevalent health concerns over the past few decades. Besides diabetes and cardiovascular disease, obesity is also connected to multiple types of cancers1,2. However, the mechanism underlying obesity-related cancers is unclear. Previous research found that obesity alters the microbiota grown in the gastrointestinal tract3, where the microbes produce inflammatory metabolites4. And obesity-induced inflammation is involved in liver cancer5. Recently, Yoshimoto et al uncovered the missing link, by which obesity promotes the production of pro-inflammatory and carcinogenic bile acids via shaping gut microbiota, and leads to hepatic inflammation and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)6 .

Model of obesity-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. Obesity or high-fat diet increases the production of deoxycholic acid (DCA), which provokes senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in hepatic stellar cells (HSCs). SASP leads to the secretion of numerous inflammatory and tumor promoting factors, and subsequently HCC development in the liver in obese mice.

Full figure and legend (21K)
Download Power Point slide (166 KB)

In mammals, bile acids are secreted into the gut lumen in high millimolar concentrations. They are converted to various secondary bile acids by microbes that are most densely colonized in the distal gut7. Secondary bile acids, including deoxycholic acid (DCA), are uptake by enterohepatic circulation to the liver. Feeding mice with high-fat diet (HFD) raised serum levels of DCA, whereas antibiotic treatment reduced the DCA levels6. Yoshimoto and colleagues found that feeding mice with HFD dramatically increased the percentage of Gram-positive bacteria in the intestinal tract. In particular, strains belonging to Clostridium cluster XI were substantially increased by HFD. These strains are essential to perform 7α-dehydroxylation that converts primary bile acids to DCA.

DCA causes DNA damage and is involved in the progression of colorectal cancers. In response to DNA damage, cells either age by senescence or self-destruct via apoptosis if the damage cannot be easily repaired. Although senescent cells can launch the cell-cycle arrest and halt cell replication, they remain metabolically active, and change gene expression, produce pro-inflammatory signaling proteins. In hepatic stellar cells (HSCs), DCA provokes the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), by which cells release several pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, tissue-remodeling enzymes, and tumor-promoting factors in the liver8,9. SASP plays essential roles in promoting the obesity-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in mice after exposure to chemical carcinogens that cause DNA damage8,10. On the other hand, a lack of SASP inducer or depletion of senescent HSCs can efficiently prevent the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in obese mice6. IL-1β is an upstream regulator of SASP, and is induced in senescent HSCs by HFD. Mice lacking the IL-1β gene reduced the expression of SASP factors in activated HSCs. Meanwhile, the number and size of liver tumors are significantly decreased in IL-1β−/− mice. These findings in mice can be extended to human beings. Adding recombinant IL-1β to cultured primary human HSCs induced the expression of IL-6 and IL-8. The signs of cellular senescence and SASP were also observed in HSCs in HCC in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis patients.

Notably, Yoshimoto and colleagues revealed several lines of evidence that blocking DCA production efficiently prevents the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma in obese mice: (1) treating mice with the oral antibiotic cocktail or vancomycin to kill Gram-positive bacteria led to a pronounced reduction of liver cancer; (2) supplementing antibiotics-treated animals with DCA promoted carcinogenesis; (3) the expression of baiJ gene, which is involved in 7α-dehydroxylation of bile acids, was drastically increased in mice fed HFD, albeit it was reduced by vancomycin. These findings provide valuable insight into the mechanism of obesity-related liver cancer and open up new possibilities for control of HCC.

It is worth noticing that residual hepatocellular carcinoma still exists after the ablation of HSCs by antibiotic treatment. Moreover, in contrast to Yoshimoto's work, intestinal Gram-negative, but not Gram-positive, bacteria have been reported to promote HCC development when induced by a different carcinogen in obese mice. Senescence induction has also been shown to inhibit the growth of several carcinoma cell lines. Therefore, further study of the molecular mechanisms linking gut microbial metabolites to SASP is required for the battle against obesity-associated HCC.

Bile acids have been implicated in a variety of human diseases, but how microbe influences bile acids metabolism is not clarified. Moreover, the by-products are not only passive carcinogens, but also active signaling molecules, which regulate host lipid and glucose homeostasis, as well as the synthesis of the bile acids themselves. Therefore, it is intriguing to elucidate the metabolism, functions, and regulations of bile acids. Gut microbiota plays important roles in many essential processes, including vitamin and amino acid biosynthesis, dietary energy harvest, and immune development. Numerous factors are able to change the gut microbial community, including diet, disease, and antibiotics, yet the health implications in human are unclear. Developing innovative technologies to systematically characterize the composition of gut bile acids could enable us to better understand the host-microbe interactions and the association with human diseases, for example, obesity and cancer7. Yoshimoto and colleagues' work paved a new way to study microbial metabolism and tumor microenvironment, as well as risk assessment, diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.

References
Calle EE, Kaaks R. Overweight, obesity and cancer: epidemiological evidence and proposed mechanisms. Nat Rev Cancer 2004; 4: 579–91. | Article | PubMed | ISI | CAS |
Khandekar MJ, Cohen P, Spiegelman BM. Molecular mechanisms of cancer development in obesity. Nat Rev Cancer 2011; 11: 886–95. | Article | PubMed | CAS |
Greenblum S, Turnbaugh PJ, Borenstein E. Metagenomic systems biology of the human gut microbiome reveals topological shifts associated with obesity and inflammatory bowel disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2012; 109: 594–9. | Article | PubMed |
Fei N, Zhao L. An opportunistic pathogen isolated from the gut of an obese human causes obesity in germfree mice. ISME J 2013; 7: 880–4. | Article | PubMed | CAS |
Sun B, Karin M. Obesity, inflammation, and liver cancer. J Hepatol 2012; 56: 704–13. | Article | PubMed | CAS |
Yoshimoto S, Loo TM, Atarashi K, Kanda H, Sato S, Oyadomari S, et al. Obesity-induced gut microbial metabolite promotes liver cancer through senescence secretome. Nature 2013; 499: 97–101. | Article | PubMed |
Ridlon JM, Kang DJ, Hylemon PB. Bile salt biotransformations by human intestinal bacteria. J Lipid Res 2006; 47: 241–59. | Article | PubMed | ISI | CAS |
Kuilman T, Peeper DS. Senescence-messaging secretome: SMS-ing cellular stress. Nat Rev Cancer 2009; 9: 81–94. | Article | PubMed | ISI | CAS |
Friedman SL. Hepatic stellate cells: protean, multifunctional, and enigmatic cells of the liver. Physiol Rev 2008; 88: 125–72. | Article | PubMed | ISI | CAS |
Collado M, Serrano M. Senescence in tumours: evidence from mice and humans. Nat Rev Cancer 2010; 10: 51–7.
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
5 août 2013 1 05 /08 /août /2013 21:46
Katrina Ray

Abstract

New findings published in Nature demonstrate the complex links between obesity, the gut microbiota and the development of cancer. Obesity induces changes to the gut microbiota and its metabolites to promote a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in hepatic stellate cells that in turn facilitates the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in mice, the authors report.

To read this article in full you may need to log in, make a payment or gain access through a site license (see right).
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
5 août 2013 1 05 /08 /août /2013 21:17
Les causes du syndrome de fatigue chronique sont encore inconnues. De nombreuses hypothèses ont été avancées, parmi lesquelles l’étiologie virale. Bien qu’une origine multifactorielle soit désormais admise, cette hypothèse d’une participation virale se trouve renforcée par une étude parue récemment dans le Journal of Medical Virology.
Le virus en cause serait un Herpès virus de type 6 (HHV-6). Il s’agit d’un virus lymphotrope très répandu, puisque à l’âge de 3 ans, plus de 95 % de la population serait déjà infectée. Dans la majorité des cas, la primo-infection passe inaperçue mais elle peut aussi se manifester par une hyperthermie suivie d’un exanthème subit rubéoliforme siégeant sur le tronc et le cou (« roséole »). Chez la plupart des individus, le virus reste ensuite latent, retrouvé dans les glandes salivaires, lymphocytes et monocytes de nombreux sujets sains. Il peut se réactiver en cas d’immuno-déficience, comme les autres types d’Herpès virus.
Mais le HHV-6 possède une particularité par rapport aux autres virus de la même famille. Pendant la période de latence, le génome de tous les autres Herpès virus constitue une formation arrondie dans le noyau des cellules, non intégrée au matériel génétique de ces cellules. L’ADN du HHV-6 peut quant à lui intégrer le matériel génétique du sujet porteur, plus précisément au niveau des télomères. Le virus devient alors transmissible de parent à enfant. Plusieurs travaux ont suggéré qu’environ 0,8 % de la population des Etats-Unis et du Royaume-Uni étaient porteurs de cette forme héréditaire de HHV-C (CIHHV-6), porteurs donc d’une copie du HHV-6 dans chacune de leurs cellules.

Or, une équipe du collège de médecine de l’Université de Floride du sud a remarqué que, sur une cohorte de patients souffrant de symptômes neurologiques variés, dont le syndrome de fatigue chronique, la prévalence des CIHHV-6 atteignait le taux de 2 %, soit plus du double de ce qui est constaté dans la population générale. Les auteurs notent alors que les patients CIHHV-6 souffrant d’un syndrome de fatigue chronique montrent des signes indiquant une réplication virale active, avec la présence du HHV-6 ARN messager (HHV-6 mRNA). Ils remarquent aussi, sans pouvoir l’interpréter, que ces patients sont infectés par une autre souche de HHV-6 « exogène ».
Les auteurs de l’étude ne se sont pas arrêtés là. Ils ont ensuite administré à ces patients un traitement antiviral utilisé pour les infections à cytomégalovirus (HHV-5), le valganciclovir ou le foscarnet. Six semaines de cette thérapie antivirale font disparaître les signes de réplication du HHV-6.
Il est bien entendu trop tôt pour conclure. Mais ce travail ouvre des perspectives intéressantes dans la recherche de l’étiologie, et peut-être du traitement, du syndrome de fatigue chronique. Environ 150 000 personnes seraient concernées en France par ce syndrome.


Dr Roseline Péluchon Publié le 05/08/2013

Pantry SN et Coll. : Persistent human herpesvirus-6 infection in patients with an inherited form of the virus. Journal of Medical Virology. Publication avancée en ligne le 25 juillet 2013.
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
2 août 2013 5 02 /08 /août /2013 07:20
Connecting the microbiome to obesity-associated cancers by Kai-Jye Lou, Senior Writer Researchers in Japan have described a pathway that shows how obesity-associated changes in the gut microbiome could lead to liver cancer. The findings lay a foundation for developing new microbiome-targeted diagnostics to identify at-risk individuals and intervention strategies. Analysis: Cover Story - Cancer SciBX 6(29); doi:10.1038/scibx.2013.743 Published online Aug. 1 2013
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
1 août 2013 4 01 /08 /août /2013 11:02
Certains médicaments sont inactivés par les micro-organismes contenus dans le tube digestif. Des chercheurs viennent d’élucider un mécanisme qui permet à une souche bactérienne de bloquer les effets d’un traitement pour le cœur. Ils ont réussi à enrayer ce processus inhibiteur chez la souris, en modifiant leur régime alimentaire.

Aucun commentaire SOYEZ LE PREMIER À RÉAGIR
Les microbes se développent par milliards dans le système digestif. Plusieurs d’entre eux peuvent influencer l’activité de certains médicaments. C’est le cas d’Eggerthella lenta qui peut inhiber l’action de la digoxine. © adonofrio, Flickr, cc by 2.0

Share on print
Share on email
Les médicaments pris par voie orale, tout comme la nourriture, glissent jusqu’aux intestins et rencontrent les milliards de microbes intestinaux nichés bien au chaud. Cette flore digestiveconsomme certains éléments nutritifs que l’organisme ne peut pas digérer, et produit au passage desnutriments essentiels à la santé, certaines vitamines par exemple.
Mais comment le microbiote intestinal réagit-il à ces médicaments ? De nombreuses études ont montré que les microbes digestifs pouvaient influencer l’action de certains d’entre eux. Les mécanismes se cachant derrière ces processus n’ont pourtant jamais été élucidés. Des scientifiques de l’université Harvard viennent d’apporter quelques éléments de réponse. Dans leur étude, publiée dans la revue Science, ils identifient un mécanisme bactérien permettant de bloquer l’action d’un traitement contre les maladies cardiaques.

Le médicament Digoxine, utilisé pour soigner certaines maladies cardiaques, verrait son action modifiée par la flore intestinale. © Gordon Museum, Wellcome Images, Flickr, cc by nc nd 2.0
Le médicament en question, souvent prescrit en cas d’insuffisance cardiaque, s’appelle le Digoxine. Comme son nom l’indique, il contient la molécule digoxine qui permet d’améliorer le fonctionnement du cœur. « On sait depuis de nombreuses années que cette molécule peut être inactivée par la flore intestinale », explique Peter Turnbaugh, le directeur de l’étude. En 1980, des chercheurs américains avaient même mis en évidence l’espèce bactérienne responsable de ce phénomène. Il s’agit d’Eggerthella lenta, une bactérie anaérobie installée dans le tube digestif humain.
Deux gènes pour inactiver un médicament pour le cœur

Or, malgré plusieurs années de recherche, les scientifiques n’avaient jamais pu décrypter le mécanisme d’inactivation de la digoxine. Armés des technologies modernes de biologie moléculaire, Peter Turnbaugh et son équipe se sont à nouveau attelés à cette tâche. Ils ont cultivé une souche d’E. lenta dans un milieu contenant ou non de la digoxine, et ont analysé les niveaux d’expression des gènes dans ces deux conditions.
Leurs résultats montrent une augmentation importante de l’expression de deux gènes en présence du médicament. « Ce qui est intéressant à propos de ces deux gènes c’est qu’ils codent tous les deux pour des cytochromes, des coenzymes qui pourraient très bien inactiver la digoxine. »
Cependant, toutes les souches d’E. lenta ne possèdent pas ces deux gènes à l’origine : la présence de la bactérie chez un individu ne signifie donc pas obligatoirement que le médicament sera inactivé. En revanche, les auteurs ont montré que le niveau d’expression des deux gènes dans des selles était un indicateur de la présence de bactéries inhibitrices de la digoxine. « Nous pouvons ainsi savoir à l’avance si la digoxine sera efficace ou non », annonce le chercheur.
Des protéines pour contrer l’influence de la flore intestinale

Les scientifiques ont approfondi leurs recherches, afin de trouver la faille de la bactérie E. lenta. Des études précédentes avaient montré qu’il était possible de limiter l’action inhibitrice de la bactérieen la cultivant en présence de protéines et en particulier de l’acide aminé arginine. Munis de ces données, ils ont entrepris des expériences chez des souris dotées d’une souche inhibitrice du médicament. Ils les ont traitées avec la digoxine et les ont nourries avec une alimentation riche ou pauvre en protéines. Leurs résultats montrent que l’ingestion de protéines augmente la quantité de médicaments retrouvés dans le sang.
Ces résultats ont permis de décrypter un des processus par lequel les bactéries influencent lesthérapies cardiaques. En suivant un régime particulier, les patients pourraient alors dompter la flore intestinale et améliorer l’efficacité des traitements médicamenteux. De nombreux travaux restent cependant à faire pour élucider tous les mystères du microbiote intestinal.

Le 31/07/2013 à 09:31 - Par Agnès Roux, Futura-Sciences
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
1 août 2013 4 01 /08 /août /2013 07:44
Scientists are struggling to figure out how to think about the microbiome Microbiome research goes without a home Scientists say core tools and expertise remain necessary. Beth Mole 30 July 2013 Trillions of microorganisms call the human body home. But ‘home’ for many US scientists studying these microscopic squatters is about to change, as funding for human microbiome research scatters across 16 of the 27 centres of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). Last year, researchers completed the US$173-million Human Microbiome Project, which took five years and generated a slew of reference data, mostly genetic sequences of all the microbes that dwell on and inside humans. But the project’s scientists fear that a lack of standards and expertise in data-gathering and analysis are hampering efforts to extract meaning from this information. At a meeting last week in Bethesda, Mary­land, they reiterated that identifying the microbes is just the first step. Researchers must also focus on how bacteria interact with each other and the human body to cause — or prevent — disease. Yet these calls for action are coming as the project faces significant downsizing: by the beginning of 2014, microbiome researchers will no longer be able to depend on centralized resources based at the NIH’s National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) in Bethesda. Related stories FDA gets to grips with faeces Pregnancy alters resident gut microbes Microbiome sequencing offers hope for diagnostics More related stories “The microbiome has so much appeal,” says Christian Jobin, an immunologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville, who studies the interplay between gut microbes, inflammation and cancer. “But we’re lacking direction right now.” In 2012, the project culminated with a flurry of publications (D. A. Relman Nature 486, 194–195; 2012). But, says Lita Proctor, the project’s programme director, some efforts still seem too focused on data-gathering and do not account for the complex ways in which microbes interact with one another and their hosts. Some scientists are “struggling to figure out how to think about the microbiome”, she says. There are several problems, says Rob Knight, a microbial ecologist at the University of Colorado Boulder. First, scientists need to forge standards on matters such as how long to wait after a person has a shower before swabbing their skin for microbes, or what a person ate before collecting a stool sample. Although researchers who gathered the reference data sets from healthy individuals tried to establish such standards, some of these have been ignored, and there is also wide variation in the way that microbiome samples are amassed from people with diseases. Second, collecting, sequencing and analysing DNA from thousands of microbial species living in and on humans requires an interdisciplinary team with knowledge of clinical ethics, engineering and bioinformatics — expertise that can be tricky to assemble. Last, it remains difficult to establish whether a microbial trend associated with a disease is the cause or a result of that disease. One solution, Knight says, would be to track people over time, to allow researchers to detect microbial changes that occur before or after someone becomes ill. Soon, he hopes, microbiome information could help doctors to predict a patient’s risk of developing various diseases, and conditions such as obesity. Jobin says few microbiologists are trying to understand what the microbes are doing and how they might be controlled. This year, he sat on a review panel for grant applications proposing to explore the microbiome’s connection to gastrointestinal cancers, and noted that many planned simply to sequence microbial communities. They were swiftly rejected. “There are very few mechanism-driven studies,” he says. Expectations are higher now than they were in 2003, when the Human Genome Project wrapped up, says Owen White, a bioinformatics researcher at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. “When you were sequencing the human genome, or the next mammalian genome, everyone knew that that was relatively hypothesis-free — and that was fine,” he says. The Human Genome Project was overseen by the NHGRI, which continues to lead genome-related work. By contrast, the Human Microbiome Project does not have a place to call home for its second phase. Over its first five years, it received $146 million from the NIH common fund, money that was managed by the NHGRI and that contributed to the development of field-wide tools. But in its second phase, from 2014 to 2016, only $15 million in common-fund money will flow through the NHGRI. Microbiome research will instead be largely supported by 16 individual NIH institutes. The project’s leaders say that the effort still needs a base to provide resources such as standardized sampling protocols, technical support, and microbiome samples and data from specific patient groups that researchers can mine. Many had assumed that the NHGRI would take on this role, because the microbiome project was initially seen as an extension of the Human Genome Project. But the NHGRI “has been less enthusiastic than expected”, Knight says. Jane Peterson, a senior adviser to the NHGRI director’s office, says that the future of human microbiome research will be in clinical applications, which does not fit with the NHGRI’s mission. But Heidi Kong, a dermatologist and microbiome researcher at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, says that the project’s basic science needs to be nurtured further before it will be ready for the clinic. Scientists need first to pin down the function of individual microbes and the body’s response to them, and should only then begin testing treatments on those interactions. “There is a bit more work we need to do,” Kong says.l Nature 500, 16–17 (01 August 2013) doi:10.1038/500016a Comment: Silvio Pitlik•2013-07-31 06:03 PM One of the major tasks of human microbiota research is to create a growing list of specific beneficial microbes. For example, recent investigations suggest that Akkermasia muciniphila, a gut inhabitant of humans and animals, has a protective role against obesity and diabetes. Such list will counteract the ubiquituous demonization of microbes and will contribute, as a collateral beneficial effect, to decrease the abusive prescription of antibiotics.
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
31 juillet 2013 3 31 /07 /juillet /2013 15:59
En dépit des progrès médicaux, les infections sont responsables de 10 % à 20 % de la mortalité infantile et de 10 % à 25 % des mort-nés dans les pays développés. Le streptocoque B est l’agent le plus fréquemment identifié. Cependant, la contribution des infections virales a été moins bien étudiée. Des chercheurs britanniques ont évalué l’implication des virus à cet égard à partir des données du Registre de Mortalité Périnatale et de celui des maternités du Nord de l’Angleterre. Les causes des décès ont été attribuées aux virus en fonction des données cliniques, des PCR, des sérologies et de la confirmation histologique. En cas de tableau caractéristique, sans agent étiquetée, le décès a été qualifié de « lié à un virus inconnu ». Selon le moment de survenue du décès, les observations ont été classées en mort fœtale tardive (20-23 semaines), mort-né (≥24 SA), décès néonatal (<28 jours) ou post-natal (28 jours à 1 an). Au total, l’ensemble des décès a été rapporté au nombre de naissances enregistrées dans la région, enfants vivants et mort-nés > 24 SA. La période étudiée a été de 21 ans (1988-2008). Sur cette période, il y eut 704 436 naissances vivantes, 2 953 pertes fœtales tardives (1 856 spontanées, 1 097 par intervention médicale), 3 954 mort-nés, 2 796 morts néonatales et 1 570 post-natales. Au total, 989 causes ont été identifiées comme certainement infectieuses, dont 108 de nature virale à l’origine de 6,5 % des pertes fœtales tardives, 14,5 % des mort-nés, 6,5 % des morts néonatales et 19,4 % des post natales. Les pertes globales combinant pertes fœtales et infantiles d’origine infectieuse, pour 100 000 naissances enregistrées, étaient de 139,6 (intervalle de confiance à 95 % [IC] 130,9-148,3) et celles attribuées aux infections virales de 15,2 (IC 12,2-18,1). Une étiologie virale spécifique a été identifiée par le seul examen post-mortem pour 55 % des pertes fœtales et 56 % des infantiles. Plus du tiers (37 %) des décès par infections virales sont survenues avant la naissance. Parmi ceux-ci, les parvovirus étaient en cause dans 63 % des cas et les CMV dans 33 % des cas. Les parvovirus étaient responsables de 28/108 (26 %) de tous les décès d’origine virale, dont 25/28 avant la naissance. Les infections à CMV étaient pour 91 % congénitales (symptomatiques avant J21) et sur les 41 % des enfants nés vivants, 78 % avaient une infection congénitale. Le CMV était responsable d’un taux global de pertes de 3,1 pour 100 000 naissances vivantes (IC 1,8-4,4) et de 1,3/100 000 morts infantiles (IC 0,4-2,1). L’herpès virus a été l’agent de 10 décès après la naissance (1,4/100 000) et les virus respiratoires de 20 cas. Au cours des 21 ans d’observation, aucune modification dans le temps n’a été observée. En conclusion, les virus représentent une contribution significative aux pertes fœtales et infantiles. Pr Jean-Jacques Baudon 31/07/2013 Williams EJ et coll. : Viral infections: contributions to late fetal death, stillbirth, and infant death. J Pediatr 2013; 163: 424-8
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
30 juillet 2013 2 30 /07 /juillet /2013 15:56
Dynamics of connective-tissue localization during chronic Borrelia burgdorferi infection Laboratory Investigation 93, 900-910 (August 2013) | doi:10.1038/labinvest.2013.81 Denise M Imai, Sunlian Feng, Emir Hodzic and Stephen W Barthold The etiologic agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, localizes preferentially in the extracellular matrix during persistence. In chronically infected laboratory mice, there is a direct association between B. burgdorferi and the proteoglycan decorin, which suggests that decorin has a role in defining protective niches for persistent spirochetes. In this study, the tissue colocalization of B. burgdorferi with decorin and the dynamics of borrelial decorin tropism were evaluated during chronic infection. Spirochetes were found to colocalize absolutely with decorin, but not collagen I in chronically infected immunocompetent C3H mice. Passive immunization of infected C3H-scid mice with B. burgdorferi-specific immune serum resulted in the localization of spirochetes in decorin-rich microenvironments, with clearance of spirochetes from decorin-poor microenvironments. In passively immunized C3H-scid mice, tissue spirochete burdens were initially reduced, but increased over time as the B. burgdorferi-specific antibody levels waned. Concurrent repopulation of the previously cleared decorin-poor microenvironments was observed with the rising tissue spirochete burden and declining antibody titer. These findings indicate that the specificity of B. burgdorferi tissue localization during chronic infection is determined by decorin, driven by the borrelia-specific antibody response, and fluctuates with the antibody response. NB: Infusion of decorin into experimental rodent spinal cord injuries has been shown to suppress scar formation and promote axon growth. Decorin has been shown to have anti-tumorigenic properties in an experimental murine tumor model and is capable of suppressing the growth of various tumor cell lines. There are multiple alternatively spliced transcript variants known for the decorin gene. Mutations in the decorin gene are associated with congenital stromal corneal dystrophy.
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
30 juillet 2013 2 30 /07 /juillet /2013 11:13
« d'ici quelques années, une analyse fine de notre flore intestinale pourrait être le préalable aux prescriptions médicales. Car parmi les dizaines de milliards de bactéries hébergées dans notre tube digestif, certaines seraient capables de modifier la structure, et donc l'efficacité, des substances médicamenteuses ».

« si nous ne sommes pas égaux face aux maladies, nous ne le sommes pas non plus en ce qui concerne les traitements médicamenteux. Certains s'avèrent inefficaces chez des patients sans que l'on sache exactement pourquoi. Depuis le séquençage du génome humain, il a pu être montré que des variations génétiques modulent la réponse aux médicaments. Mais ce déterminisme génétique n'explique pas entièrement la variabilité d'efficacité thérapeutique qui existe entre individus ».

« S'il n'est pas encore possible d'identifier toutes les souches bactériennes présentes dans le tube digestif humain, les travaux publiés jusqu'à présent montrent que le microbiote intestinal comprend une large composante commune entre individus et une part plus spécifique. C'est dans cette spécificité que la variabilité de réponse aux traitements trouverait sa source ».

« selon une étude américaine publiée dans Science la bactérie Eggerthella lenta serait responsable de l'inactivation de la digoxine, une molécule largement prescrite pour traiter certains types d'arythmies cardiaques ». L’auteur de l’étude, le Pr Peter Turnbaugh, microbiologiste à l'université de Harvard, remarque que « la digoxine est utilisée comme cardiotonique depuis longtemps. Or les médecins observaient depuis toujours qu'une partie des patients semblent «imperméables» au traitement ».

« les chercheurs américains ont étudié les interactions entre microbiote intestinal et digoxine chez des souris. Leurs travaux ont non seulement permis d'identifier la souche bactérienne responsable de l'inactivation de la digoxine, mais décrivent également le mécanisme biochimique en cause ».

« les bactéries ne se contentent pas d'inactiver des molécules médicamenteuses. Certaines sont aussi capables de les transformer en dérivés parfois toxiques pour notre organisme. A contrario, elles sont parfois nécessaires pour activer certains traitements. Mieux comprendre le fonctionnement de ces micro-organismes permettrait donc à moyen terme de proposer aux patients des thérapies compatibles avec leur «profil bactérien» ».

Joël Doré, chercheur spécialiste du microbiote intestinal à l’Inra, précise toutefois : « Nous ne rêvons pas de médecine individualisée, mais nous espérons voir se développer une médecine adaptée à des patients qui partageraient certaines caractéristiques bactériennes ».
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article