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30 juillet 2017 7 30 /07 /juillet /2017 16:16

Avant la fillette de neuf ans née séropositive, d'autres cas de rémissions sans traitements à vie Ils n'ont pas vraiment "guéri" mais vivent sans traitements.

24/07/2017 Marine Le Breton Journaliste FRANCIS SHEEHAN

Avant la fillette de neuf ans née séropositive, d'autres cas de rémissions sans traitements à vie l

C'est le troisième cas de rémission sans traitement à vie observé chez un enfant.

Ce lundi 24 juillet, des chercheurs ont annoncé qu'une fillette née séropositive vit depuis neuf ans en bonne santé sans médicaments.

Cette fillette sud-africaine a été placée sous traitements antirétroviraux à l'âge de deux mois.

Ceux-ci ont empêché le développement du VIH.

Au bout de dix mois, le traitement a été arrêté et aujourd'hui, le virus du sida est toujours en sommeil chez l'enfant.

Cela fait donc un peu plus de huit ans ans qu'elle ne suit aucun traitement et pourtant, elle va bien.

Le virus est toujours présent mais à "charge indétectable": les symptômes sont inexistants et le virus ne se reproduit pas. Il s'agit d'un cas de rémission rarissime et porteur d'espoir.

Aussi incroyable qu'est cette nouvelle, on a pourtant une impression de "déjà-vu".

On se souvient tous par exemple du cas "Magic Johnson".

Le basketteur star des Los Angeles Lakers avait annoncé sa séropositivité en 1991.

A cette époque, il est dévasté.

Et pourtant, plus de 20 ans après son infection, le sportif est toujours là et en pleine forme.

Guéri?

Pas vraiment. le virus est toujours présent dans son corps mais à un niveau infinitésimal.

"Magic a bénéficié du lancement des médicaments expérimentaux avant qu'ils ne soient disponibles au grand public", explique à Live Science Spencer Lieb, épidémiologiste américain.

Il faut en effet attendre 1996 pour connaître l'arrivée des trithérapies. Johsnon, lui, a pu en bénéficier dès 1994.

Des cas comme celui de Magic Johnson, il en existe beaucoup.

Aujourd'hui, on peut vivre avec le VIH en prenant un traitement antirétroviral, qui bloque la progression du virus.

C'est le cas de 19,5 millions de personnes dans le monde.

Mais il existe par ailleurs des cas exceptionnels de rémission ou de "guérison".

Quels sont ces différents cas?

En quoi sont-ils différents, ou semblables, avec celui de la fillette de 9 ans?

Timothy Brown, dit le patient de Berlin

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Published by Jean-Pierre LABLANCHY - CHRONIMED - dans Infections froides
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29 juillet 2017 6 29 /07 /juillet /2017 06:58

Is there hope for Lyme patients? Interview with dr. Richard Horowitz "Is there hope for Lyme patients?" One of the top Infectious Diseases doctors answers to this urgent question for many. This is the first publication of the 'Teike takes on Lyme' research project. Can you please begin by introducing yourself? My name is Dr. Richard Horowitz. I am a board-certified internist. I have treated over 12.000 people with chronic Lyme disease in the United States, and I am the medical director of the Hudson Valley Healing Arts Center. I opened our center approximately 20 years ago to meet the needs of all these chronically ill patients that had a difficult time getting access to care in the US. I heard you were in Toronto, for what occasion where you there? I was teaching at a Lyme conference. I met with government officials and one of the members of parliament. There was a gala for young children called 'Lyme Out Loud Canada.' It was for children who did not have access to care, who couldn't afford treatments and who are sick in Canada. I also gave a talk to doctors the day afterwards. It was a four-hour lecture on the science of Lyme disease and tick-borne infections, and how we treat these multiple infections in the United States. You have treated more than 12.000 patients, how are they now? MSIDS model Fortunately, the vast majority of them are doing quite well. Over the past 30 years I've developed a model that is a 16-point health care map that I call MSIDS: Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome. What I found for those who are chronically ill who come to see me is that they don't just have Lyme disease. They usually have co-infections like Babesiosis which is a malaria-like parasite, and many have Bartonella which is a form of cat scratch fever. We also find that people usually have other overlapping causes of inflammation apart from chronic infections. For example, they may suffer from chronic insomnia, be eating the wrong diet, i.e., eating allergic foods which causes an inflammatory response, or they may be deficient in essential minerals like zinc, which can increase inflammatory molecules in the body. These can result in chronic fatigue, headaches, joint and muscle pain, nerve pain, memory and concentration problems, and sleep disorders. So, we have discovered that there are up to 16 factors keeping these people sick apart from Lyme disease. Once we adequately treat all the forms of Lyme disease, as well as associated co-infections, food sensitivities, mineral deficiencies, sleep disorders, mitochondrial dysfunction, hormone dysregulation, POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome)/with imbalances of the autonomic nervous system, and treat internal and external toxins and imbalances with the microbiome of the gut, the majority of our chronically ill patients improve. PLEASE-study Unfortunately, many of the double-blind studies on Lyme disease that have been done in the United States and in Europe like the PLEASE study don't adequately address all the overlapping causes of illness that we see in our patients that I previously discussed, especially the co-infections. They also did not integrate any of the new scientific research on Lyme “persister” cells in the body, or borrelia biofilms. We find that when we treat chronically ill patients with combination antibiotic regimens that include novel persister drugs like Dapsone, with biofilm busters, and simultaneously treat co-infections and abnormalities on the 16-point MSIDS map, these can make a big difference in getting people better. Persister Protocols I published two articles in the scientific literature last year about persister drugs for borrelia, which are essentially using old mycobacterium drugs like Dapsone and pyrazinamide for treating Lyme. To answer how are they doing: many people who had failed prior treatments are now doing much better with these new protocols which target the different persister forms of Lyme disease and multiple co-infections. We are very excited that we are finding new protocols to help patients who are chronically ill. What do you think is the importance of these persister-studies and are you able to help patients with these new insights? Research of Kim Lewis and Ying Zhang It is quite important. There were several breakthroughs in the medical research during the past couple of years. One came from dr. Kim Lewis at Northeastern University. The other came from Dr Ying Zhang and his colleagues at John Hopkins University. They are well respected PhD researchers, and they both found that there are persister cells that exist in Lyme disease, as there are in other chronic infections. We used to think that it was just the cystic forms of borrelia that were responsible for persistent and relapsing infections. Now we know that there are heterogeneous dormant persister cells that exist in biofilms, and borrelia can be in different stages of replication. Results in the laboratory Dr. Lewis did research in his laboratory which showed that when he used ceftriaxone for Borrelia in culture it would kill off 99% of the bacteria, but once he stopped it the bacteria would grow back. Dr. Zhang from John Hopkins also discovered that Borrelia persisted after standard antibiotics used for Lyme, like doxycycline and ceftriaxone, and that various antibiotic combinations had different effects against these persister cells. How many people have been infected with Lyme disease? I don't think we know how far this epidemic has really spread. The CDC in the United States says that they have underestimated the numbers by 10-fold, so in 2013 the numbers went from 30.000 per year to over 300.000 per year. It is now being estimated that it is about 400.000 cases per year in the United States. We know from the WHO figures in Europe we are dealing with over a million cases in just Eastern Europe alone. This was published a couple of years ago. In 2015 there was a publication in Emerging Infectious Diseases that there was a 320% increase in the number of counties affected by Lyme disease in the US. Migratory birds are spreading the ticks from county to county. This is also why the disease is spreading through Europe, and at this point it has also spread to China and many other countries worldwide. CFS & Fibromyalgia Lyme mimics other diseases: for example, 3.5% of the US population has Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / S.E.I.D.), and 1.5% of the US population has Fibromyalgia. That means that approximately 5% of the 350 million people in the United States have a chronic fatiguing, musculo-skeletal illness. That translates into roughly 18 million people with Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia, and we know that they are clinical diagnoses. There are no blood tests for these conditions. So, if you have fatigue, aches and pains, memory problems and you can't fall asleep and your doctor does an insensitive ELISA test (which misses about half of the cases of Lyme disease), you could be diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibromyalgia. Auto-immune Illnesses We also know that approximately 50 million people are diagnosed with auto-immune illnesses in the United States, and Lyme imitates rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and multiple sclerosis. The vast majority of the people that I have seen with MS actually have Lyme disease. We can get many of them off their MS drugs by treating Lyme and overlapping sources of inflammation on the 16-point MSIDS map. Alzheimer’s We are having a dementia epidemic in the United States and worldwide. Every 67 seconds in the United States someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. We now know that Borrelia spirochetes are found in the brains of Alzheimer patients. Many researchers from across the world have published this in the medical literature, including Dr Judith Miklossy from Switzerland and Dr Alan McDonald from the US. Recently, researchers from Drexel University in Pennsylvania published that they are finding Lyme spirochetes in biofilms of the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. Lyme is “The Great Imitator” The reason we can’t estimate the true number of cases is because Lyme is imitating a broad range of other diseases, including Alzheimer's, autoimmune disease, as well as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/S.E.I.D. (Systemic Exertional Intolerance Disease) and Fibromyalgia. When you put the number of people affected by all those diseases together, we could be dealing with millions of cases of Lyme and associated tick-borne disease in the United States alone. Of course, that is an estimate. When the CDC estimated their numbers, they were using the two-tiered protocol of using an ELISA followed by an Western Blot, which will only pick up about 50% of the cases of Lyme disease. You advocate personalized treatment and take into consideration multiple causes for one disease manifestation. How is your approach different than the current medical paradigm and their approach of diseases such as Lyme? ILADS and IDSA Guidelines There are two sets of medical guidelines for treating Lyme disease. You have the IDSA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, which in essence says Lyme is easy to diagnose and easy to treat. The IDSA guidelines, which are no longer on the US government's website (The National Guidelines Clearinghouse), were taken off because they are 10 years old, and not up to date with the new science that has emerged. The ILADS guidelines however are still listed on the US government's website. I was one of the founding members of ILADS, and was one of the authors of the first ILADS guidelines. The recent ILADS guidelines were published by Dr Daniel Cameron, and met the Institute of Medicine’s highest standards for guideline development. The Annals of Internal Medicine published an article several years ago which looked at the IDSA guidelines, and found that at least 50% of the recommendations were the authors opinions, and not based on strong levels of scientific evidence. For example, the IDSA guidelines say that antibiotics don’t help those with chronic Lyme disease, but when you look at the three-double blind placebo controlled studies that where done by the NIH, in two out of the three studies the people got better. In the Krups study which was published several years ago, their fatigue got better, and in Dr Brian Fallon's study, published in Neurology in 2008, the patient’s cognitive issues got better. Their PET scans lit up on ceftriaxone, showing that the drug was having an effect. The problem is that they didn't stay better because they stopped the treatment after several months, and Lyme can be a persistent infection when not caught early. New Borrelia species One of the other problems that we are facing is that there are different emerging species of Borrelia. There have been at least 15 new species of Borrelia reported in the medical literature in the last 20 years. That is almost 1 new species per year. For example, Borrelia miyamotoi, which is a relapsing fever spirochete, is spreading in up to 15% of the ticks in the United States and in Europe, and tests for Lyme disease will not pick up that particular strain of Borrelia. So, you could get an EM rash. You could have Bell’s Palsy. You could have a meningitis and encephalitis and be quite ill and the doctor may suspect Lyme disease, but the testing comes back negative for Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, because it is due to a different borrelia species, and therefore the physician may choose not to treat. That would lead to long term medical problems and potential disability. So, the guidelines are not taking into account all of these emerging species. We know that in Europe for example, Borrelia afzelii will cause an acrodermatitis chronicum atrophicans (ACA) rash. Borrelia garinii on the other hand, can cause neuroborreliosis. Then you have other species in Europe like Borrelia Valaisiana as well as other borrelia species that also cause illness, and the standard testing will not pick them up. Co-infections We need to look at emerging borrelia species as well as other associated tick-borne co-infections to help patients that are ill. In the past two years, peer-reviewed medical articles have shown that over 80% of the time Babesia is transmitted at the same time as Lyme disease. That is like getting malaria with Lyme. We found that these malarial-like parasites are important in keeping people ill, and they also can suppress the immune system. That makes it more difficult to get rid of other parasitic infections when you have Babesia. Similarly, Bartonella will also suppress immunity (just like Lyme does). We see a lot of people with Lyme disease who have Chronic Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID) where their immune systems are not functioning properly. In these cases, you can give antibiotics for prolonged periods of time, but the immune deficiency interferes with treatment and clearing the bacteria from the body. Similarly, if you don't properly treat the co-infections, and other overlapping causes of illness/inflammation on the 16-point MSIDS map, such as internal and external toxins, detoxification problems, food allergies and sensitivities, mitochondrial dysfunction, hormonal dysregulation and sleep disorders, people will not completely get better. Health Care Costs Health care costs are rising globally, and that is why we need a paradigm shift in how we practice medicine. Not just for Lyme, but for all chronic diseases. 86% of the health care costs, and 70% of the deaths in the United States are due to chronic disease, yet we don't even have a model for treating chronic disease? Every world government is trying to figure out how to lower healthcare costs and yet we are not looking at the underlying causes of what is causing chronic disease. The 16-point MSIDS model is a personalized, precision medical model that has helped thousands with chronic illness that have failed traditional approaches, and 19% of the people in the United States are disabled. I know in Europe you are struggling with the same problem. We need to look at other ways to treat these chronic diseases, and I believe that the MSIDS model is a good start. Lyme is not a new disease. How long has it been going on for, as what do you see is needed to make progress? Old bacteria Lyme has been around for a very long time. They found evidence for Borrelia spirochetes in Ötzi the Neanderthal man over 5000 years ago. They have found Babesia in fossilized specimens. These organisms have been around for millions of years. So, although these bacteria and parasites are not new, people have been increasingly moving into wooded areas, and imbalances in the ecosystems are leading to an increase in mice populations, contributing to an expansion of these tick-borne infections. We are seeing a rise in Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis, and more ticks are containing the Powassan virus, the Tickborne Encephalitis Virus, the Heartland virus, Bourbon virus, as well as rickettsial infections... many of these tick-borne infections are spreading. Some of these organisms have not only been around for a long period of time, but their numbers are also now increasing in the ticks, and we can get multiple infections with just one tick bite, leading to disabling symptoms. Environmental toxins I am also seeing a lot of environmental toxins like heavy metals and mold toxins getting into people. According to research by the CDC and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), we are all exposed to hundreds of toxins every day, and these toxins can accumulate in the body because they are fat soluble and bind tightly to tissues. These toxins have recently been found to be linked to autoimmune reactions and multiple autoimmune diseases. Lyme disease can also trigger autoimmune reactions. Environmental toxins combined with some of these tick-borne infections are responsible for some of the chronic disease manifestations that we are now seeing in the 21st century. That is why we need to change how we approach healthcare, and shift the paradigm of how we practice medicine. We can’t just be looking for one cause for one illness. We need to look at multifactorial causes of illness, such as chronic infections, environmental toxins, and how the detoxification systems of the body are functioning. We should be especially careful because some of these infections, as well as environmental toxins, can be passed from a mother to a child. Studies from Harvard and UC California Davis are showing that these environmental toxins are now showing up in children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We know that doctors in Europe, who treat Lyme disease, are seeing some of these children with developmental delays and ASD, get better by treating infections and toxins. Modes of transmission We know that Lyme can be transmitted from a mother to her fetus, as can other tick-borne infections like Babesia, Bartonella and Rickettsial infections. Babesia, Anaplasma and Bartonella are also in the blood supply, and these, as well as relapsing fever borrelia can be transmitted by blood. We therefore have to be careful because there are multiple modes of transmission possible. I don't think most pregnant women are aware that they can have miscarriages and pass on these infections and toxins to their children. To protect our future generations, we need to pay attention to these potential infections and multiple environmental toxins that are now getting into the body, which can be transmitted from generation to generation. You have been collaborating with a team on a report for the World Health Organization (WHO). What is the significance of this report? Insurance coverage Insurance companies are oftentimes restricting access to proper care for those suffering with Lyme disease and associated co-infections. This is because they have adopted the IDSA guidelines, which unfortunately do not work in clinical practice for those suffering with chronic manifestations of Lyme disease. I have patients that have been to 10-20 doctors before seeing me, and are still ill, because those physicians were using IDSA guidelines which say that the blood testing is reliable, and that Lyme disease is easy to cure. Nothing could be farther from the truth. The standard two-tiered testing for Lyme disease is unreliable, and misses approximately half of those with the disease. If they do happen to be diagnosed, using one month of antibiotics will not help the majority of those with chronic Lyme/Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome. We need to improve the guidelines and coding for those with chronic Lyme disease, to help prevent long term suffering and disability. WHO ICD coding We looked at the WHO guidelines and ICD 9 coding. We realized that there are no adequate codes for people who have chronic Lyme disease. There are many different manifestations for borreliosis, and many of the codes for these manifestations were not in the ICD9, ICD10 or ICD11 coding that is about to be released. We therefore created a document which expanded the coding for the clinical manifestations of Lyme, and organized a meeting in Geneva with the rapporteur from the WHO. Adhoc Committee Doctors, researchers and scientists from different countries across the world came together to review the scientific literature. We put together a document for the WHO, which expanded the coding for Lyme disease. The WHO is concerned with human rights and access to care, especially for those who are disadvantaged. Chronic Lyme patients are not having proper access to care because of inadequate diagnostic and therapeutic protocols for treating the disease. We hope this will help expand care, create better access to care, and help those who are suffering worldwide. For the people who are not getting better with the treatments available to them now, is there hope in the future? New solutions I have been working on solutions for Lyme disease now for 30 years. When I wrote my first book: “Why Can't I Get Better?” I would say that approximately 90-92% of the people got help using the 16-point MSIDS model that was described in my first book. In my new book “How Can I Get Better?” which was released in February of 2017, we included information on the new persister protocols that I published in the scientific literature last year. We are finding that among the 8-10% of people who were still ill using the MSIDS model described in my first book, approximately 2/3 of them are now getting better using the persister protocols that I have published in my second book: “How Can I Get Better?”. I do not have to put a PICC-line in or use IV ceftriaxone in many of these people because the dapsone protocol combined with doxycycline and rifampin is turning out to be an excellent protocol. It gets good penetration into the central nervous system. Many of my patient’s symptoms are getting better with this protocol, including resistant fatigue, joint/muscle and nerve pain, memory and concentration problems, as well as their sleep and mood disorders. There is hope There is hope for Lyme patients. They should never give up! We find that it sometimes however takes years to see improvement in the most difficult cases. I just had a young man who was in a wheelchair for 2,5 years unable to walk with Lyme and Parkinsonism’s, but he is finally now starting to walk out of his wheelchair. I recently saw a young girl in a wheelchair that was dying from uncontrolled seizures. She was on high doses of morphine for pain, and we found that it was Lyme, Babesia, Bartonella and POTS that was causing her illness. She is now symptom free and off morphine. In her case, she managed to see improvement within the first month of treatment. There are solutions and answers, but you have to apply the 16-point MSIDS model to get to all of the underlying causes of the illness, and hang in there! I want to thank you for taking the time and interviewing me, because it is so important to give people hope, and discuss these important issues and solutions for all the Lyme patients that are suffering. dr. Richard Horowitz Written by Huib

Is there hope for Lyme patients? Interview with dr. Richard Horowitz

"Is there hope for Lyme patients?"

One of the top Infectious Diseases doctors answers to this urgent question for many.

This is the first publication of the 'Teike takes on Lyme' research project.

Can you please begin by introducing yourself?

My name is Dr. Richard Horowitz. I

am a board-certified internist. I have treated over 12.000 people with chronic Lyme disease in the United States, and I am the medical director of the Hudson Valley Healing Arts Center.

I opened our center approximately 20 years ago to meet the needs of all these chronically ill patients that had a difficult time getting access to care in the US.

I heard you were in Toronto, for what occasion where you there? I was teaching at a Lyme conference. I met with government officials and one of the members of parliament.

There was a gala for young children called 'Lyme Out Loud Canada.' It was for children who did not have access to care, who couldn't afford treatments and who are sick in Canada.

I also gave a talk to doctors the day afterwards. It was a four-hour lecture on the science of Lyme disease and tick-borne infections, and how we treat these multiple infections in the United States.

You have treated more than 12.000 patients, how are they now?

MSIDS model Fortunately, the vast majority of them are doing quite well.

Over the past 30 years I've developed a model that is a 16-point health care map that I call

MSIDS: Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome.

What I found for those who are chronically ill who come to see me is that they don't just have Lyme disease.

They usually have co-infections like Babesiosis which is a malaria-like parasite, and many have Bartonella which is a form of cat scratch fever. We also find that people usually have other overlapping causes of inflammation apart from chronic infections.

For example, they may suffer from chronic insomnia, be eating the wrong diet, i.e., eating allergic foods which causes an inflammatory response, or they may be deficient in essential minerals like zinc, which can increase inflammatory molecules in the body.

These can result in chronic fatigue, headaches, joint and muscle pain, nerve pain, memory and concentration problems, and sleep disorders.

So, we have discovered that there are up to 16 factors keeping these people sick apart from Lyme disease.

Once we adequately treat all the forms of Lyme disease, as well as associated co-infections, food sensitivities, mineral deficiencies, sleep disorders, mitochondrial dysfunction, hormone dysregulation, POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome)/with imbalances of the autonomic nervous system, and treat internal and external toxins and imbalances with the microbiome of the gut, the majority of our chronically ill patients improve.

PLEASE-study Unfortunately, many of the double-blind studies on Lyme disease that have been done in the United States and in Europe like the PLEASE study don't adequately address all the overlapping causes of illness that we see in our patients that I previously discussed, especially the co-infections.

They also did not integrate any of the new scientific research on Lyme “persister” cells in the body, or borrelia biofilms. We find that when we treat chronically ill patients with combination antibiotic regimens that include novel persister drugs like Dapsone, with biofilm busters, and simultaneously treat co-infections and abnormalities on the 16-point MSIDS map, these can make a big difference in getting people better.

Persister Protocols published two articles in the scientific literature last year about persister drugs for borrelia, which are essentially using old mycobacterium drugs like Dapsone and pyrazinamide for treating Lyme.

To answer how are they doing: many people who had failed prior treatments are now doing much better with these new protocols which target the different persister forms of Lyme disease and multiple co-infections.

We are very excited that we are finding new protocols to help patients who are chronically ill. What do you think is the importance of these persister-studies and are you able to help patients with these new insights? Research of Kim Lewis and Ying Zhang It is quite important.

There were several breakthroughs in the medical research during the past couple of years.

One came from dr. Kim Lewis at Northeastern University.

The other came from Dr Ying Zhang and his colleagues at John Hopkins University.

They are well respected PhD researchers, and they both found that there are persister cells that exist in Lyme disease, as there are in other chronic infections.

We used to think that it was just the cystic forms of borrelia that were responsible for persistent and relapsing infections.

Now we know that there are heterogeneous dormant persister cells that exist in biofilms, and borrelia can be in different stages of replication.

Results in the laboratory Dr. Lewis did research in his laboratory which showed that when he used ceftriaxone for Borrelia in culture it would kill off 99% of the bacteria, but once he stopped it the bacteria would grow back.

Dr. Zhang from John Hopkins also discovered that Borrelia persisted after standard antibiotics used for Lyme, like doxycycline and ceftriaxone, and that various antibiotic combinations had different effects against these persister cells.

How many people have been infected with Lyme disease?

I don't think we know how far this epidemic has really spread.

The CDC in the United States says that they have underestimated the numbers by 10-fold, so in 2013 the numbers went from 30.000 per year to over 300.000 per year.

It is now being estimated that it is about 400.000 cases per year in the United States.

We know from the WHO figures in Europe we are dealing with over a million cases in just Eastern Europe alone.

This was published a couple of years ago.

In 2015 there was a publication in Emerging Infectious Diseases that there was a 320% increase in the number of counties affected by Lyme disease in the US. Migratory birds are spreading the ticks from county to county.

This is also why the disease is spreading through Europe, and at this point it has also spread to China and many other countries worldwide.

CFS & Fibromyalgia Lyme mimics other diseases:

for example, 3.5% of the US population has Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / S.E.I.D.), and 1.5% of the US population has Fibromyalgia.

That means that approximately 5% of the 350 million people in the United States have a chronic fatiguing, musculo-skeletal illness.

That translates into roughly 18 million people with Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia, and we know that they are clinical diagnoses.

There are no blood tests for these conditions.

So, if you have fatigue, aches and pains, memory problems and you can't fall asleep and your doctor does an insensitive ELISA test (which misses about half of the cases of Lyme disease), you could be diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibromyalgia.

Auto-immune Illnesses We also know that approximately 50 million people are diagnosed with auto-immune illnesses in the United States, and Lyme imitates rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and multiple sclerosis.

The vast majority of the people that I have seen with MS actually have Lyme disease.

We can get many of them off their MS drugs by treating Lyme and overlapping sources of inflammation on the 16-point MSIDS map.

Alzheimer’s

We are having a dementia epidemic in the United States and worldwide.

Every 67 seconds in the United States someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

We now know that Borrelia spirochetes are found in the brains of Alzheimer patients.

Many researchers from across the world have published this in the medical literature, including Dr Judith Miklossy from Switzerland and Dr Alan McDonald from the US.

Recently, researchers from Drexel University in Pennsylvania published that they are finding Lyme spirochetes in biofilms of the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.

Lyme is “The Great Imitator” The reason we can’t estimate the true number of cases is because Lyme is imitating a broad range of other diseases, including Alzheimer's, autoimmune disease, as well as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/S.E.I.D. (Systemic Exertional Intolerance Disease) and Fibromyalgia.

When you put the number of people affected by all those diseases together, we could be dealing with millions of cases of Lyme and associated tick-borne disease in the United States alone.

Of course, that is an estimate.

When the CDC estimated their numbers, they were using the two-tiered protocol of using an ELISA followed by an Western Blot, which will only pick up about 50% of the cases of Lyme disease.

You advocate personalized treatment and take into consideration multiple causes for one disease manifestation.

How is your approach different than the current medical paradigm and their approach of diseases such as Lyme?

ILADS and IDSA Guidelines

There are two sets of medical guidelines for treating Lyme disease. You have the IDSA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, which in essence says Lyme is easy to diagnose and easy to treat. The IDSA guidelines, which are no longer on the US government's website (The National Guidelines Clearinghouse), were taken off because they are 10 years old, and not up to date with the new science that has emerged.

The ILADS guidelines however are still listed on the US government's website.

I was one of the founding members of ILADS, and was one of the authors of the first ILADS guidelines.

The recent ILADS guidelines were published by Dr Daniel Cameron, and met the Institute of Medicine’s highest standards for guideline development.

The Annals of Internal Medicine published an article several years ago which looked at the IDSA guidelines, and found that at least 50% of the recommendations were the authors opinions, and not based on strong levels of scientific evidence.

For example, the IDSA guidelines say that antibiotics don’t help those with chronic Lyme disease, but when you look at the three-double blind placebo controlled studies that where done by the NIH, in two out of the three studies the people got better.

In the Krups study which was published several years ago, their fatigue got better, and in Dr Brian Fallon's study, published in Neurology in 2008, the patient’s cognitive issues got better.

Their PET scans lit up on ceftriaxone, showing that the drug was having an effect.

The problem is that they didn't stay better because they stopped the treatment after several months, and Lyme can be a persistent infection when not caught early.

New Borrelia species One of the other problems that we are facing is that there are different emerging species of Borrelia.

There have been at least 15 new species of Borrelia reported in the medical literature in the last 20 years. That is almost 1 new species per year.

For example, Borrelia miyamotoi, which is a relapsing fever spirochete, is spreading in up to 15% of the ticks in the United States and in Europe, and tests for Lyme disease will not pick up that particular strain of Borrelia.

So, you could get an EM rash. You could have Bell’s Palsy.

You could have a meningitis and encephalitis and be quite ill and the doctor may suspect Lyme disease, but the testing comes back negative for Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, because it is due to a different borrelia species, and therefore the physician may choose not to treat. That would lead to long term medical problems and potential disability.

So, the guidelines are not taking into account all of these emerging species. We know that in Europe for example, Borrelia afzelii will cause an acrodermatitis chronicum atrophicans (ACA) rash. Borrelia garinii on the other hand, can cause neuroborreliosis.

Then you have other species in Europe like Borrelia Valaisiana as well as other borrelia species that also cause illness, and the standard testing will not pick them up.

Co-infections We need to look at emerging borrelia species as well as other associated tick-borne co-infections to help patients that are ill.

In the past two years, peer-reviewed medical articles have shown that over 80% of the time Babesia is transmitted at the same time as Lyme disease.

That is like getting malaria with Lyme. We found that these malarial-like parasites are important in keeping people ill, and they also can suppress the immune system.

That makes it more difficult to get rid of other parasitic infections when you have Babesia. Similarly, Bartonella will also suppress immunity (just like Lyme does).

We see a lot of people with Lyme disease who have Chronic Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID) where their immune systems are not functioning properly.

In these cases, you can give antibiotics for prolonged periods of time, but the immune deficiency interferes with treatment and clearing the bacteria from the body. Similarly, if you don't properly treat the co-infections, and other overlapping causes of illness/inflammation on the 16-point MSIDS map, such as internal and external toxins, detoxification problems, food allergies and sensitivities, mitochondrial dysfunction, hormonal dysregulation and sleep disorders, people will not completely get better. Health Care Costs Health care costs are rising globally, and that is why we need a paradigm shift in how we practice medicine.

Not just for Lyme, but for all chronic diseases. 86% of the health care costs, and 70% of the deaths in the United States are due to chronic disease, yet we don't even have a model for treating chronic disease? Every world government is trying to figure out how to lower healthcare costs and yet we are not looking at the underlying causes of what is causing chronic disease. The 16-point MSIDS model is a personalized, precision medical model that has helped thousands with chronic illness that have failed traditional approaches, and 19% of the people in the United States are disabled. I know in Europe you are struggling with the same problem. We need to look at other ways to treat these chronic diseases, and I believe that the MSIDS model is a good start. Lyme is not a new disease. How long has it been going on for, as what do you see is needed to make progress? Old bacteria Lyme has been around for a very long time. They found evidence for Borrelia spirochetes in Ötzi the Neanderthal man over 5000 years ago. They have found Babesia in fossilized specimens. These organisms have been around for millions of years. So, although these bacteria and parasites are not new, people have been increasingly moving into wooded areas, and imbalances in the ecosystems are leading to an increase in mice populations, contributing to an expansion of these tick-borne infections. We are seeing a rise in Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis, and more ticks are containing the Powassan virus, the Tickborne Encephalitis Virus, the Heartland virus, Bourbon virus, as well as rickettsial infections... many of these tick-borne infections are spreading. Some of these organisms have not only been around for a long period of time, but their numbers are also now increasing in the ticks, and we can get multiple infections with just one tick bite, leading to disabling symptoms. Environmental toxins I am also seeing a lot of environmental toxins like heavy metals and mold toxins getting into people. According to research by the CDC and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), we are all exposed to hundreds of toxins every day, and these toxins can accumulate in the body because they are fat soluble and bind tightly to tissues. These toxins have recently been found to be linked to autoimmune reactions and multiple autoimmune diseases. Lyme disease can also trigger autoimmune reactions. Environmental toxins combined with some of these tick-borne infections are responsible for some of the chronic disease manifestations that we are now seeing in the 21st century. That is why we need to change how we approach healthcare, and shift the paradigm of how we practice medicine. We can’t just be looking for one cause for one illness. We need to look at multifactorial causes of illness, such as chronic infections, environmental toxins, and how the detoxification systems of the body are functioning. We should be especially careful because some of these infections, as well as environmental toxins, can be passed from a mother to a child. Studies from Harvard and UC California Davis are showing that these environmental toxins are now showing up in children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We know that doctors in Europe, who treat Lyme disease, are seeing some of these children with developmental delays and ASD, get better by treating infections and toxins. Modes of transmission We know that Lyme can be transmitted from a mother to her fetus, as can other tick-borne infections like Babesia, Bartonella and Rickettsial infections. Babesia, Anaplasma and Bartonella are also in the blood supply, and these, as well as relapsing fever borrelia can be transmitted by blood. We therefore have to be careful because there are multiple modes of transmission possible. I don't think most pregnant women are aware that they can have miscarriages and pass on these infections and toxins to their children. To protect our future generations, we need to pay attention to these potential infections and multiple environmental toxins that are now getting into the body, which can be transmitted from generation to generation. You have been collaborating with a team on a report for the World Health Organization (WHO). What is the significance of this report? Insurance coverage Insurance companies are oftentimes restricting access to proper care for those suffering with Lyme disease and associated co-infections. This is because they have adopted the IDSA guidelines, which unfortunately do not work in clinical practice for those suffering with chronic manifestations of Lyme disease. I have patients that have been to 10-20 doctors before seeing me, and are still ill, because those physicians were using IDSA guidelines which say that the blood testing is reliable, and that Lyme disease is easy to cure. Nothing could be farther from the truth. The standard two-tiered testing for Lyme disease is unreliable, and misses approximately half of those with the disease. If they do happen to be diagnosed, using one month of antibiotics will not help the majority of those with chronic Lyme/Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome. We need to improve the guidelines and coding for those with chronic Lyme disease, to help prevent long term suffering and disability. WHO ICD coding We looked at the WHO guidelines and ICD 9 coding. We realized that there are no adequate codes for people who have chronic Lyme disease. There are many different manifestations for borreliosis, and many of the codes for these manifestations were not in the ICD9, ICD10 or ICD11 coding that is about to be released. We therefore created a document which expanded the coding for the clinical manifestations of Lyme, and organized a meeting in Geneva with the rapporteur from the WHO. Adhoc Committee Doctors, researchers and scientists from different countries across the world came together to review the scientific literature. We put together a document for the WHO, which expanded the coding for Lyme disease. The WHO is concerned with human rights and access to care, especially for those who are disadvantaged. Chronic Lyme patients are not having proper access to care because of inadequate diagnostic and therapeutic protocols for treating the disease. We hope this will help expand care, create better access to care, and help those who are suffering worldwide. For the people who are not getting better with the treatments available to them now, is there hope in the future? New solutions I have been working on solutions for Lyme disease now for 30 years. When I wrote my first book: “Why Can't I Get Better?” I would say that approximately 90-92% of the people got help using the 16-point MSIDS model that was described in my first book. In my new book “How Can I Get Better?” which was released in February of 2017, we included information on the new persister protocols that I published in the scientific literature last year. We are finding that among the 8-10% of people who were still ill using the MSIDS model described in my first book, approximately 2/3 of them are now getting better using the persister protocols that I have published in my second book: “How Can I Get Better?”. I do not have to put a PICC-line in or use IV ceftriaxone in many of these people because the dapsone protocol combined with doxycycline and rifampin is turning out to be an excellent protocol. It gets good penetration into the central nervous system. Many of my patient’s symptoms are getting better with this protocol, including resistant fatigue, joint/muscle and nerve pain, memory and concentration problems, as well as their sleep and mood disorders. There is hope There is hope for Lyme patients. They should never give up! We find that it sometimes however takes years to see improvement in the most difficult cases. I just had a young man who was in a wheelchair for 2,5 years unable to walk with Lyme and Parkinsonism’s, but he is finally now starting to walk out of his wheelchair. I recently saw a young girl in a wheelchair that was dying from uncontrolled seizures. She was on high doses of morphine for pain, and we found that it was Lyme, Babesia, Bartonella and POTS that was causing her illness. She is now symptom free and off morphine. In her case, she managed to see improvement within the first month of treatment. There are solutions and answers, but you have to apply the 16-point MSIDS model to get to all of the underlying causes of the illness, and hang in there! I want to thank you for taking the time and interviewing me, because it is so important to give people hope, and discuss these important issues and solutions for all the Lyme patients that are suffering. dr. Richard Horowitz Written by Huib"Is there hope for Lyme patients?" One of the top Infectious Diseases doctors answers to this urgent question for many. This is the first publication of the 'Teike takes on Lyme' research project. Can you please begin by introducing yourself? My name is Dr. Richard Horowitz. I am a board-certified internist. I have treated over 12.000 people with chronic Lyme disease in the United States, and I am the medical director of the Hudson Valley Healing Arts Center. I opened our center approximately 20 years ago to meet the needs of all these chronically ill patients that had a difficult time getting access to care in the US. I heard you were in Toronto, for what occasion where you there? I was teaching at a Lyme conference. I met with government officials and one of the members of parliament. There was a gala for young children called 'Lyme Out Loud Canada.' It was for children who did not have access to care, who couldn't afford treatments and who are sick in Canada. I also gave a talk to doctors the day afterwards. It was a four-hour lecture on the science of Lyme disease and tick-borne infections, and how we treat these multiple infections in the United States. You have treated more than 12.000 patients, how are they now? MSIDS model Fortunately, the vast majority of them are doing quite well. Over the past 30 years I've developed a model that is a 16-point health care map that I call MSIDS: Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome. What I found for those who are chronically ill who come to see me is that they don't just have Lyme disease. They usually have co-infections like Babesiosis which is a malaria-like parasite, and many have Bartonella which is a form of cat scratch fever. We also find that people usually have other overlapping causes of inflammation apart from chronic infections. For example, they may suffer from chronic insomnia, be eating the wrong diet, i.e., eating allergic foods which causes an inflammatory response, or they may be deficient in essential minerals like zinc, which can increase inflammatory molecules in the body. These can result in chronic fatigue, headaches, joint and muscle pain, nerve pain, memory and concentration problems, and sleep disorders. So, we have discovered that there are up to 16 factors keeping these people sick apart from Lyme disease. Once we adequately treat all the forms of Lyme disease, as well as associated co-infections, food sensitivities, mineral deficiencies, sleep disorders, mitochondrial dysfunction, hormone dysregulation, POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome)/with imbalances of the autonomic nervous system, and treat internal and external toxins and imbalances with the microbiome of the gut, the majority of our chronically ill patients improve. PLEASE-study Unfortunately, many of the double-blind studies on Lyme disease that have been done in the United States and in Europe like the PLEASE study don't adequately address all the overlapping causes of illness that we see in our patients that I previously discussed, especially the co-infections. They also did not integrate any of the new scientific research on Lyme “persister” cells in the body, or borrelia biofilms. We find that when we treat chronically ill patients with combination antibiotic regimens that include novel persister drugs like Dapsone, with biofilm busters, and simultaneously treat co-infections and abnormalities on the 16-point MSIDS map, these can make a big difference in getting people better. Persister Protocols I published two articles in the scientific literature last year about persister drugs for borrelia, which are essentially using old mycobacterium drugs like Dapsone and pyrazinamide for treating Lyme. To answer how are they doing: many people who had failed prior treatments are now doing much better with these new protocols which target the different persister forms of Lyme disease and multiple co-infections. We are very excited that we are finding new protocols to help patients who are chronically ill. What do you think is the importance of these persister-studies and are you able to help patients with these new insights? Research of Kim Lewis and Ying Zhang It is quite important. There were several breakthroughs in the medical research during the past couple of years. One came from dr. Kim Lewis at Northeastern University. The other came from Dr Ying Zhang and his colleagues at John Hopkins University. They are well respected PhD researchers, and they both found that there are persister cells that exist in Lyme disease, as there are in other chronic infections. We used to think that it was just the cystic forms of borrelia that were responsible for persistent and relapsing infections. Now we know that there are heterogeneous dormant persister cells that exist in biofilms, and borrelia can be in different stages of replication. Results in the laboratory Dr. Lewis did research in his laboratory which showed that when he used ceftriaxone for Borrelia in culture it would kill off 99% of the bacteria, but once he stopped it the bacteria would grow back. Dr. Zhang from John Hopkins also discovered that Borrelia persisted after standard antibiotics used for Lyme, like doxycycline and ceftriaxone, and that various antibiotic combinations had different effects against these persister cells. How many people have been infected with Lyme disease? I don't think we know how far this epidemic has really spread. The CDC in the United States says that they have underestimated the numbers by 10-fold, so in 2013 the numbers went from 30.000 per year to over 300.000 per year. It is now being estimated that it is about 400.000 cases per year in the United States. We know from the WHO figures in Europe we are dealing with over a million cases in just Eastern Europe alone. This was published a couple of years ago. In 2015 there was a publication in Emerging Infectious Diseases that there was a 320% increase in the number of counties affected by Lyme disease in the US. Migratory birds are spreading the ticks from county to county. This is also why the disease is spreading through Europe, and at this point it has also spread to China and many other countries worldwide. CFS & Fibromyalgia Lyme mimics other diseases: for example, 3.5% of the US population has Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / S.E.I.D.), and 1.5% of the US population has Fibromyalgia. That means that approximately 5% of the 350 million people in the United States have a chronic fatiguing, musculo-skeletal illness. That translates into roughly 18 million people with Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia, and we know that they are clinical diagnoses. There are no blood tests for these conditions. So, if you have fatigue, aches and pains, memory problems and you can't fall asleep and your doctor does an insensitive ELISA test (which misses about half of the cases of Lyme disease), you could be diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibromyalgia. Auto-immune Illnesses We also know that approximately 50 million people are diagnosed with auto-immune illnesses in the United States, and Lyme imitates rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and multiple sclerosis. The vast majority of the people that I have seen with MS actually have Lyme disease. We can get many of them off their MS drugs by treating Lyme and overlapping sources of inflammation on the 16-point MSIDS map. Alzheimer’s We are having a dementia epidemic in the United States and worldwide. Every 67 seconds in the United States someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. We now know that Borrelia spirochetes are found in the brains of Alzheimer patients. Many researchers from across the world have published this in the medical literature, including Dr Judith Miklossy from Switzerland and Dr Alan McDonald from the US. Recently, researchers from Drexel University in Pennsylvania published that they are finding Lyme spirochetes in biofilms of the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. Lyme is “The Great Imitator” The reason we can’t estimate the true number of cases is because Lyme is imitating a broad range of other diseases, including Alzheimer's, autoimmune disease, as well as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/S.E.I.D. (Systemic Exertional Intolerance Disease) and Fibromyalgia. When you put the number of people affected by all those diseases together, we could be dealing with millions of cases of Lyme and associated tick-borne disease in the United States alone. Of course, that is an estimate. When the CDC estimated their numbers, they were using the two-tiered protocol of using an ELISA followed by an Western Blot, which will only pick up about 50% of the cases of Lyme disease. You advocate personalized treatment and take into consideration multiple causes for one disease manifestation. How is your approach different than the current medical paradigm and their approach of diseases such as Lyme? ILADS and IDSA Guidelines There are two sets of medical guidelines for treating Lyme disease. You have the IDSA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, which in essence says Lyme is easy to diagnose and easy to treat. The IDSA guidelines, which are no longer on the US government's website (The National Guidelines Clearinghouse), were taken off because they are 10 years old, and not up to date with the new science that has emerged. The ILADS guidelines however are still listed on the US government's website. I was one of the founding members of ILADS, and was one of the authors of the first ILADS guidelines. The recent ILADS guidelines were published by Dr Daniel Cameron, and met the Institute of Medicine’s highest standards for guideline development. The Annals of Internal Medicine published an article several years ago which looked at the IDSA guidelines, and found that at least 50% of the recommendations were the authors opinions, and not based on strong levels of scientific evidence. For example, the IDSA guidelines say that antibiotics don’t help those with chronic Lyme disease, but when you look at the three-double blind placebo controlled studies that where done by the NIH, in two out of the three studies the people got better. In the Krups study which was published several years ago, their fatigue got better, and in Dr Brian Fallon's study, published in Neurology in 2008, the patient’s cognitive issues got better. Their PET scans lit up on ceftriaxone, showing that the drug was having an effect. The problem is that they didn't stay better because they stopped the treatment after several months, and Lyme can be a persistent infection when not caught early. New Borrelia species One of the other problems that we are facing is that there are different emerging species of Borrelia. There have been at least 15 new species of Borrelia reported in the medical literature in the last 20 years. That is almost 1 new species per year. For example, Borrelia miyamotoi, which is a relapsing fever spirochete, is spreading in up to 15% of the ticks in the United States and in Europe, and tests for Lyme disease will not pick up that particular strain of Borrelia. So, you could get an EM rash. You could have Bell’s Palsy. You could have a meningitis and encephalitis and be quite ill and the doctor may suspect Lyme disease, but the testing comes back negative for Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, because it is due to a different borrelia species, and therefore the physician may choose not to treat. That would lead to long term medical problems and potential disability. So, the guidelines are not taking into account all of these emerging species. We know that in Europe for example, Borrelia afzelii will cause an acrodermatitis chronicum atrophicans (ACA) rash. Borrelia garinii on the other hand, can cause neuroborreliosis. Then you have other species in Europe like Borrelia Valaisiana as well as other borrelia species that also cause illness, and the standard testing will not pick them up. Co-infections We need to look at emerging borrelia species as well as other associated tick-borne co-infections to help patients that are ill. In the past two years, peer-reviewed medical articles have shown that over 80% of the time Babesia is transmitted at the same time as Lyme disease. That is like getting malaria with Lyme. We found that these malarial-like parasites are important in keeping people ill, and they also can suppress the immune system. That makes it more difficult to get rid of other parasitic infections when you have Babesia. Similarly, Bartonella will also suppress immunity (just like Lyme does). We see a lot of people with Lyme disease who have Chronic Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID) where their immune systems are not functioning properly. In these cases, you can give antibiotics for prolonged periods of time, but the immune deficiency interferes with treatment and clearing the bacteria from the body. Similarly, if you don't properly treat the co-infections, and other overlapping causes of illness/inflammation on the 16-point MSIDS map, such as internal and external toxins, detoxification problems, food allergies and sensitivities, mitochondrial dysfunction, hormonal dysregulation and sleep disorders, people will not completely get better. Health Care Costs Health care costs are rising globally, and that is why we need a paradigm shift in how we practice medicine. Not just for Lyme, but for all chronic diseases. 86% of the health care costs, and 70% of the deaths in the United States are due to chronic disease, yet we don't even have a model for treating chronic disease? Every world government is trying to figure out how to lower healthcare costs and yet we are not looking at the underlying causes of what is causing chronic disease. The 16-point MSIDS model is a personalized, precision medical model that has helped thousands with chronic illness that have failed traditional approaches, and 19% of the people in the United States are disabled. I know in Europe you are struggling with the same problem. We need to look at other ways to treat these chronic diseases, and I believe that the MSIDS model is a good start. Lyme is not a new disease. How long has it been going on for, as what do you see is needed to make progress? Old bacteria Lyme has been around for a very long time. They found evidence for Borrelia spirochetes in Ötzi the Neanderthal man over 5000 years ago. They have found Babesia in fossilized specimens. These organisms have been around for millions of years. So, although these bacteria and parasites are not new, people have been increasingly moving into wooded areas, and imbalances in the ecosystems are leading to an increase in mice populations, contributing to an expansion of these tick-borne infections. We are seeing a rise in Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis, and more ticks are containing the Powassan virus, the Tickborne Encephalitis Virus, the Heartland virus, Bourbon virus, as well as rickettsial infections... many of these tick-borne infections are spreading. Some of these organisms have not only been around for a long period of time, but their numbers are also now increasing in the ticks, and we can get multiple infections with just one tick bite, leading to disabling symptoms. Environmental toxins I am also seeing a lot of environmental toxins like heavy metals and mold toxins getting into people. According to research by the CDC and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), we are all exposed to hundreds of toxins every day, and these toxins can accumulate in the body because they are fat soluble and bind tightly to tissues. These toxins have recently been found to be linked to autoimmune reactions and multiple autoimmune diseases. Lyme disease can also trigger autoimmune reactions. Environmental toxins combined with some of these tick-borne infections are responsible for some of the chronic disease manifestations that we are now seeing in the 21st century. That is why we need to change how we approach healthcare, and shift the paradigm of how we practice medicine. We can’t just be looking for one cause for one illness. We need to look at multifactorial causes of illness, such as chronic infections, environmental toxins, and how the detoxification systems of the body are functioning. We should be especially careful because some of these infections, as well as environmental toxins, can be passed from a mother to a child. Studies from Harvard and UC California Davis are showing that these environmental toxins are now showing up in children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We know that doctors in Europe, who treat Lyme disease, are seeing some of these children with developmental delays and ASD, get better by treating infections and toxins. Modes of transmission We know that Lyme can be transmitted from a mother to her fetus, as can other tick-borne infections like Babesia, Bartonella and Rickettsial infections. Babesia, Anaplasma and Bartonella are also in the blood supply, and these, as well as relapsing fever borrelia can be transmitted by blood. We therefore have to be careful because there are multiple modes of transmission possible. I don't think most pregnant women are aware that they can have miscarriages and pass on these infections and toxins to their children. To protect our future generations, we need to pay attention to these potential infections and multiple environmental toxins that are now getting into the body, which can be transmitted from generation to generation. You have been collaborating with a team on a report for the World Health Organization (WHO). What is the significance of this report? Insurance coverage Insurance companies are oftentimes restricting access to proper care for those suffering with Lyme disease and associated co-infections. This is because they have adopted the IDSA guidelines, which unfortunately do not work in clinical practice for those suffering with chronic manifestations of Lyme disease. I have patients that have been to 10-20 doctors before seeing me, and are still ill, because those physicians were using IDSA guidelines which say that the blood testing is reliable, and that Lyme disease is easy to cure. Nothing could be farther from the truth. The standard two-tiered testing for Lyme disease is unreliable, and misses approximately half of those with the disease. If they do happen to be diagnosed, using one month of antibiotics will not help the majority of those with chronic Lyme/Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome. We need to improve the guidelines and coding for those with chronic Lyme disease, to help prevent long term suffering and disability. WHO ICD coding We looked at the WHO guidelines and ICD 9 coding. We realized that there are no adequate codes for people who have chronic Lyme disease. There are many different manifestations for borreliosis, and many of the codes for these manifestations were not in the ICD9, ICD10 or ICD11 coding that is about to be released. We therefore created a document which expanded the coding for the clinical manifestations of Lyme, and organized a meeting in Geneva with the rapporteur from the WHO. Adhoc Committee Doctors, researchers and scientists from different countries across the world came together to review the scientific literature. We put together a document for the WHO, which expanded the coding for Lyme disease. The WHO is concerned with human rights and access to care, especially for those who are disadvantaged. Chronic Lyme patients are not having proper access to care because of inadequate diagnostic and therapeutic protocols for treating the disease. We hope this will help expand care, create better access to care, and help those who are suffering worldwide. For the people who are not getting better with the treatments available to them now, is there hope in the future? New solutions I have been working on solutions for Lyme disease now for 30 years. When I wrote my first book: “Why Can't I Get Better?” I would say that approximately 90-92% of the people got help using the 16-point MSIDS model that was described in my first book. In my new book “How Can I Get Better?” which was released in February of 2017, we included information on the new persister protocols that I published in the scientific literature last year. We are finding that among the 8-10% of people who were still ill using the MSIDS model described in my first book, approximately 2/3 of them are now getting better using the persister protocols that I have published in my second book: “How Can I Get Better?”. I do not have to put a PICC-line in or use IV ceftriaxone in many of these people because the dapsone protocol combined with doxycycline and rifampin is turning out to be an excellent protocol. It gets good penetration into the central nervous system. Many of my patient’s symptoms are getting better with this protocol, including resistant fatigue, joint/muscle and nerve pain, memory and concentration problems, as well as their sleep and mood disorders. There is hope There is hope for Lyme patients. They should never give up! We find that it sometimes however takes years to see improvement in the most difficult cases. I just had a young man who was in a wheelchair for 2,5 years unable to walk with Lyme and Parkinsonism’s, but he is finally now starting to walk out of his wheelchair. I recently saw a young girl in a wheelchair that was dying from uncontrolled seizures. She was on high doses of morphine for pain, and we found that it was Lyme, Babesia, Bartonella and POTS that was causing her illness. She is now symptom free and off morphine. In her case, she managed to see improvement within the first month of treatment. There are solutions and answers, but you have to apply the 16-point MSIDS model to get to all of the underlying causes of the illness, and hang in there! I want to thank you for taking the time and interviewing me, because it is so important to give people hope, and discuss these important issues and solutions for all the Lyme patients that are suffering. dr. Richard Horowitz Written by Huib

Is there hope for Lyme patients? Interview with dr. Richard Horowitz  "Is there hope for Lyme patients?" One of the top Infectious Diseases doctors answers to this urgent question for many. This is the first publication of the 'Teike takes on Lyme' research project.   Can you please begin by introducing yourself?  My name is Dr. Richard Horowitz. I am a board-certified internist. I have treated over 12.000 people with chronic Lyme disease in the United States, and I am the medical director of the Hudson Valley Healing Arts Center.  I opened our center approximately 20 years ago to meet the needs of all these chronically ill patients that had a difficult time getting access to care in the US.  I heard you were in Toronto, for what occasion where you there?  I was teaching at a Lyme conference. I met with government officials and one of the members of parliament. There was a gala for young children called 'Lyme Out Loud Canada.' It was for children who did not have access to care, who couldn't afford treatments and who are sick in Canada. I also gave a talk to doctors the day afterwards. It was a four-hour lecture on the science of Lyme disease and tick-borne infections, and how we treat these multiple infections in the United States.   You have treated more than 12.000 patients, how are they now?  MSIDS model  Fortunately, the vast majority of them are doing quite well. Over the past 30 years I've developed a model that is a 16-point health care map that I call MSIDS: Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome. What I found for those who are chronically ill who come to see me is that they don't just have Lyme disease. They usually have co-infections like Babesiosis which is a malaria-like parasite, and many have Bartonella which is a form of cat scratch fever. We also find that people usually have other overlapping causes of inflammation apart from chronic infections.  For example, they may suffer from chronic insomnia, be eating the wrong diet, i.e., eating allergic foods which causes an inflammatory response, or they may be deficient in essential minerals like zinc, which can increase inflammatory molecules in the body. These can result in chronic fatigue, headaches, joint and muscle pain, nerve pain, memory and concentration problems, and sleep disorders.  So, we have discovered that there are up to 16 factors keeping these people sick apart from Lyme disease. Once we adequately treat all the forms of Lyme disease, as well as associated co-infections, food sensitivities, mineral deficiencies, sleep disorders, mitochondrial dysfunction, hormone dysregulation, POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome)/with imbalances of the autonomic nervous system, and treat internal and external toxins and imbalances with the microbiome of the gut, the majority of our chronically ill patients improve.   PLEASE-study  Unfortunately, many of the double-blind studies on Lyme disease that have been done in the United States and in Europe like the PLEASE study don't adequately address all the overlapping causes of illness that we see in our patients that I previously discussed, especially the co-infections. They also did not integrate any of the new scientific research on Lyme “persister” cells in the body, or borrelia biofilms.  We find that when we treat chronically ill patients with combination antibiotic regimens that include novel persister drugs like Dapsone, with biofilm busters, and simultaneously treat co-infections and abnormalities on the 16-point MSIDS map, these can make a big difference in getting people better.   Persister Protocols  I published two articles in the scientific literature last year about persister drugs for borrelia, which are essentially using old mycobacterium drugs like Dapsone and pyrazinamide for treating Lyme. To answer how are they doing: many people who had failed prior treatments are now doing much better with these new protocols which target the different persister forms of Lyme disease and multiple co-infections. We are very excited that we are finding new protocols to help patients who are chronically ill.   What do you think is the importance of these persister-studies and are you able to help patients with these new insights?  Research of Kim Lewis and Ying Zhang  It is quite important. There were several breakthroughs in the medical research during the past couple of years. One came from dr. Kim Lewis at Northeastern University. The other came from Dr Ying Zhang and his colleagues at John Hopkins University. They are well respected PhD researchers, and they both found that there are persister cells that exist in Lyme disease, as there are in other chronic infections. We used to think that it was just the cystic forms of borrelia that were responsible for persistent and relapsing infections. Now we know that there are heterogeneous dormant persister cells that exist in biofilms, and borrelia can be in different stages of replication.  Results in the laboratory  Dr. Lewis did research in his laboratory which showed that when he used ceftriaxone for Borrelia in culture it would kill off 99% of the bacteria, but once he stopped it the bacteria would grow back. Dr. Zhang from John Hopkins also discovered that Borrelia persisted after standard antibiotics used for Lyme, like doxycycline and ceftriaxone, and that various antibiotic combinations had different effects against these persister cells.  How many people have been infected with Lyme disease?   I don't think we know how far this epidemic has really spread. The CDC in the United States says that they have underestimated the numbers by 10-fold, so in 2013 the numbers went from 30.000 per year to over 300.000 per year. It is now being estimated that it is about 400.000 cases per year in the United States. We know from the WHO figures in Europe we are dealing with over a million cases in just Eastern Europe alone. This was published a couple of years ago.   In 2015 there was a publication in Emerging Infectious Diseases that there was a 320% increase in the number of counties affected by Lyme disease in the US. Migratory birds are spreading the ticks from county to county. This is also why the disease is spreading through Europe, and at this point it has also spread to China and many other countries worldwide.  CFS & Fibromyalgia  Lyme mimics other diseases: for example, 3.5% of the US population has Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / S.E.I.D.), and 1.5% of the US population has Fibromyalgia. That means that approximately 5% of the 350 million people in the United States have a chronic fatiguing, musculo-skeletal illness. That translates into roughly 18 million people with Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia, and we know that they are clinical diagnoses. There are no blood tests for these conditions.  So, if you have fatigue, aches and pains, memory problems and you can't fall asleep and your doctor does an insensitive ELISA test (which misses about half of the cases of Lyme disease), you could be diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibromyalgia.   Auto-immune Illnesses  We also know that approximately 50 million people are diagnosed with auto-immune illnesses in the United States, and Lyme imitates rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and multiple sclerosis. The vast majority of the people that I have seen with MS actually have Lyme disease. We can get many of them off their MS drugs by treating Lyme and overlapping sources of inflammation on the 16-point MSIDS map.  Alzheimer’s  We are having a dementia epidemic in the United States and worldwide. Every 67 seconds in the United States someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. We now know that Borrelia spirochetes are found in the brains of Alzheimer patients. Many researchers from across the world have published this in the medical literature, including Dr Judith Miklossy from Switzerland and Dr Alan McDonald from the US. Recently, researchers from Drexel University in Pennsylvania published that they are finding Lyme spirochetes in biofilms of the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.  Lyme is “The Great Imitator”  The reason we can’t estimate the true number of cases is because Lyme is imitating a broad range of other diseases, including Alzheimer's, autoimmune disease, as well as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/S.E.I.D. (Systemic Exertional Intolerance Disease) and Fibromyalgia. When you put the number of people affected by all those diseases together, we could be dealing with millions of cases of Lyme and associated tick-borne disease in the United States alone. Of course, that is an estimate. When the CDC estimated their numbers, they were using the two-tiered protocol of using an ELISA followed by an Western Blot, which will only pick up about 50% of the cases of Lyme disease.   You advocate personalized treatment and take into consideration multiple causes for one disease manifestation. How is your approach different than the current medical paradigm and their approach of diseases such as Lyme?  ILADS and IDSA Guidelines  There are two sets of medical guidelines for treating Lyme disease. You have the IDSA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, which in essence says Lyme is easy to diagnose and easy to treat. The IDSA guidelines, which are no longer on the US government's website (The National Guidelines Clearinghouse), were taken off because they are 10 years old, and not up to date with the new science that has emerged. The ILADS guidelines however are still listed on the US government's website. I was one of the founding members of ILADS, and was one of the authors of the first ILADS guidelines. The recent ILADS guidelines were published by Dr Daniel Cameron, and met the Institute of Medicine’s highest standards for guideline development.  The Annals of Internal Medicine published an article several years ago which looked at the IDSA guidelines, and found that at least 50% of the recommendations were the authors opinions, and not based on strong levels of scientific evidence. For example, the IDSA guidelines say that antibiotics don’t help those with chronic Lyme disease, but when you look at the three-double blind placebo controlled studies that where done by the NIH, in two out of the three studies the people got better. In the Krups study which was published several years ago, their fatigue got better, and in Dr Brian Fallon's study, published in Neurology in 2008, the patient’s cognitive issues got better. Their PET scans lit up on ceftriaxone, showing that the drug was having an effect. The problem is that they didn't stay better because they stopped the treatment after several months, and Lyme can be a persistent infection when not caught early.   New Borrelia species  One of the other problems that we are facing is that there are different emerging species of Borrelia. There have been at least 15 new species of Borrelia reported in the medical literature in the last 20 years. That is almost 1 new species per year. For example, Borrelia miyamotoi, which is a relapsing fever spirochete, is spreading in up to 15% of the ticks in the United States and in Europe, and tests for Lyme disease will not pick up that particular strain of Borrelia. So, you could get an EM rash. You could have Bell’s Palsy. You could have a meningitis and encephalitis and be quite ill and the doctor may suspect Lyme disease, but the testing comes back negative for Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, because it is due to a different borrelia species, and therefore the physician may choose not to treat. That would lead to long term medical problems and potential disability.   So, the guidelines are not taking into account all of these emerging species. We know that in Europe for example, Borrelia afzelii will cause an acrodermatitis chronicum atrophicans (ACA) rash.   Borrelia garinii on the other hand, can cause neuroborreliosis. Then you have other species in Europe like Borrelia Valaisiana as well as other borrelia species that also cause illness, and the standard testing will not pick them up.   Co-infections  We need to look at emerging borrelia species as well as other associated tick-borne co-infections to help patients that are ill. In the past two years, peer-reviewed medical articles have shown that over 80% of the time Babesia is transmitted at the same time as Lyme disease. That is like getting malaria with Lyme. We found that these malarial-like parasites are important in keeping people ill, and they also can suppress the immune system. That makes it more difficult to get rid of other parasitic infections when you have Babesia. Similarly, Bartonella will also suppress immunity (just like Lyme does). We see a lot of people with Lyme disease who have Chronic Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID) where their immune systems are not functioning properly. In these cases, you can give antibiotics for prolonged periods of time, but the immune deficiency interferes with treatment and clearing the bacteria from the body. Similarly, if you don't properly treat the co-infections, and other overlapping causes of illness/inflammation on the 16-point MSIDS map, such as internal and external toxins, detoxification problems, food allergies and sensitivities, mitochondrial dysfunction, hormonal dysregulation and sleep disorders, people will not completely get better.    Health Care Costs  Health care costs are rising globally, and that is why we need a paradigm shift in how we practice medicine. Not just for Lyme, but for all chronic diseases. 86% of the health care costs, and 70% of the deaths in the United States are due to chronic disease, yet we don't even have a model for treating chronic disease? Every world government is trying to figure out how to lower healthcare costs and yet we are not looking at the underlying causes of what is causing chronic disease. The 16-point MSIDS model is a personalized, precision medical model that has helped thousands with chronic illness that have failed traditional approaches, and 19% of the people in the United States are disabled. I know in Europe you are struggling with the same problem. We need to look at other ways to treat these chronic diseases, and I believe that the MSIDS model is a good start.   Lyme is not a new disease. How long has it been going on for, as what do you see is needed to make progress?  Old bacteria  Lyme has been around for a very long time. They found evidence for Borrelia spirochetes in Ötzi the Neanderthal man over 5000 years ago. They have found Babesia in fossilized specimens. These organisms have been around for millions of years. So, although these bacteria and parasites are not new, people have been increasingly moving into wooded areas, and imbalances in the ecosystems are leading to an increase in mice populations, contributing to an expansion of these tick-borne infections.  We are seeing a rise in Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis, and more ticks are containing the Powassan virus, the Tickborne Encephalitis Virus, the Heartland virus, Bourbon virus, as well as rickettsial infections... many of these tick-borne infections are spreading. Some of these organisms have not only been around for a long period of time, but their numbers are also now increasing in the ticks, and we can get multiple infections with just one tick bite, leading to disabling symptoms.   Environmental toxins  I am also seeing a lot of environmental toxins like heavy metals and mold toxins getting into people. According to research by the CDC and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), we are all exposed to hundreds of toxins every day, and these toxins can accumulate in the body because they are fat soluble and bind tightly to tissues. These toxins have recently been found to be linked to autoimmune reactions and multiple autoimmune diseases. Lyme disease can also trigger autoimmune reactions. Environmental toxins combined with some of these tick-borne infections are responsible for some of the chronic disease manifestations that we are now seeing in the 21st century.    That is why we need to change how we approach healthcare, and shift the paradigm of how we practice medicine. We can’t just be looking for one cause for one illness. We need to look at multifactorial causes of illness, such as chronic infections, environmental toxins, and how the detoxification systems of the body are functioning. We should be especially careful because some of these infections, as well as environmental toxins, can be passed from a mother to a child.   Studies from Harvard and UC California Davis are showing that these environmental toxins are now showing up in children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We know that doctors in Europe, who treat Lyme disease, are seeing some of these children with developmental delays and ASD, get better by treating infections and toxins.  Modes of transmission  We know that Lyme can be transmitted from a mother to her fetus, as can other tick-borne infections like Babesia, Bartonella and Rickettsial infections. Babesia, Anaplasma and Bartonella are also in the blood supply, and these, as well as relapsing fever borrelia can be transmitted by blood. We therefore have to be careful because there are multiple modes of transmission possible. I don't think most pregnant women are aware that they can have miscarriages and pass on these infections and toxins to their children. To protect our future generations, we need to pay attention to these potential infections and multiple environmental toxins that are now getting into the body, which can be transmitted from generation to generation.   You have been collaborating with a team on a report for the World Health Organization (WHO). What is the significance of this report?  Insurance coverage  Insurance companies are oftentimes restricting access to proper care for those suffering with Lyme disease and associated co-infections. This is because they have adopted the IDSA guidelines, which unfortunately do not work in clinical practice for those suffering with chronic manifestations of Lyme disease. I have patients that have been to 10-20 doctors before seeing me, and are still ill, because those physicians were using IDSA guidelines which say that the blood testing is reliable, and that Lyme disease is easy to cure.  Nothing could be farther from the truth. The standard two-tiered testing for Lyme disease is unreliable, and misses approximately half of those with the disease. If they do happen to be diagnosed, using one month of antibiotics will not help the majority of those with chronic Lyme/Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome. We need to improve the guidelines and coding for those with chronic Lyme disease, to help prevent long term suffering and disability.   WHO ICD coding  We looked at the WHO guidelines and ICD 9 coding. We realized that there are no adequate codes for people who have chronic Lyme disease. There are many different manifestations for borreliosis, and many of the codes for these manifestations were not in the ICD9, ICD10 or ICD11 coding that is about to be released. We therefore created a document which expanded the coding for the clinical manifestations of Lyme, and organized a meeting in Geneva with the rapporteur from the WHO.   Adhoc Committee  Doctors, researchers and scientists from different countries across the world came together to review the scientific literature. We put together a document for the WHO, which expanded the coding for Lyme disease. The WHO is concerned with human rights and access to care, especially for those who are disadvantaged. Chronic Lyme patients are not having proper access to care because of inadequate diagnostic and therapeutic protocols for treating the disease. We hope this will help expand care, create better access to care, and help those who are suffering worldwide.   For the people who are not getting better with the treatments available to them now, is there hope in the future?  New solutions  I have been working on solutions for Lyme disease now for 30 years. When I wrote my first book: “Why Can't I Get Better?” I would say that approximately 90-92% of the people got help using the 16-point MSIDS model that was described in my first book. In my new book “How Can I Get Better?” which was released in February of 2017, we included information on the new persister protocols that I published in the scientific literature last year.  We are finding that among the 8-10% of people who were still ill using the MSIDS model described in my first book, approximately 2/3 of them are now getting better using the persister protocols that I have published in my second book: “How Can I Get Better?”. I do not have to put a PICC-line in or use IV ceftriaxone in many of these people because the dapsone protocol combined with doxycycline and rifampin is turning out to be an excellent protocol. It gets good penetration into the central nervous system. Many of my patient’s symptoms are getting better with this protocol, including resistant fatigue, joint/muscle and nerve pain, memory and concentration problems, as well as their sleep and mood disorders.   There is hope  There is hope for Lyme patients. They should never give up! We find that it sometimes however takes years to see improvement in the most difficult cases. I just had a young man who was in a wheelchair for 2,5 years unable to walk with Lyme and Parkinsonism’s, but he is finally now starting to walk out of his wheelchair.  I recently saw a young girl in a wheelchair that was dying from uncontrolled seizures. She was on high doses of morphine for pain, and we found that it was Lyme, Babesia, Bartonella and POTS that was causing her illness. She is now symptom free and off morphine. In her case, she managed to see improvement within the first month of treatment.  There are solutions and answers, but you have to apply the 16-point MSIDS model to get to all of the underlying causes of the illness, and hang in there!   I want to thank you for taking the time and interviewing me, because it is so important to give people hope, and discuss these important issues and solutions for all the Lyme patients that are suffering.  dr. Richard Horowitz      Written by	Huib
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Published by Jean-Pierre LABLANCHY - CHRONIMED - dans Infections froides
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28 juillet 2017 5 28 /07 /juillet /2017 08:57

Dans la bouche aussi
les bactéries font la loi

 
 
  • Les bactéries conditionnent la santé de la bouche et du reste du corpsLes bactéries conditionnent la santé de la bouche et du reste du corps

Cela ne vous mettra peut-être pas en appétit, là tout de suite, mais notre bouche héberge une variété incroyable de micro-organismes. Quelque 10 milliards de micro-organismes y résident, représentant plus de 700 espèces différentes, majoritairement des bactéries, mais aussi des levures, des virus, des champignons… Après le microbiote intestinal, celui de la bouche confirme, s’il le fallait, que le nombre des micro-organismes que nous abritons excède de beaucoup celui de nos propres cellules ! Mais la flore buccale est encore sous-estimée. Gingivite, stomatite, parodontite... l'équilibre de la flore buccale joue un rôle prépondérant dans la santé de votre bouche, et bien au-delà…

La bouche, comme de nombreuses autres surfaces de l’organisme, est colonisée par une flore bactérienne que l’on qualifie de commensale quand elle est sainement équilibrée. Son rôle est de protéger les dents, les gencives et les muqueuses contre des invasions d’agents pathogènes, ce qu’elle fait plutôt bien tant qu’elle n’est pas perturbée. Il existe deux types de flores (ou biofilms) dans la bouche : la flore supra-gingivale, en contact avec la salive, les aliments et l’oxygène, et la flore sous-gingivale composée majoritairement de bactéries à Gram négatif anaérobies.


Cet ensemble évolue dans une interrelation permanente. On peut voir ça comme une belle pelouse, dont la densité et la vigueur suffisent à contrôler l’invasion par les mauvaises herbes. Mais quand certaines conditions affectent défavorablement ce bel écosystème, l’herbe verte et grasse disparaît et laisse le champ libre aux mauvaises herbes. Dans la bouche, ce sont les « bonnes bactéries » qui cèdent le terrain aux « mauvaises », celles qui entraîneront la déminéralisation des dents et les maladies gingivales ou parodontales.

Se brosser les dents après les repas suffit-il à avoir des dents en bonne santé ? Utiliser un bain de bouche règle-t-il tous les problèmes liés à plaque dentaire ? Ce serait un minimum, mais en matière d’hygiène buccale, les Français sont à la traîne. Ils n’achètent en moyenne que 1,5 brosse à dents par an alors que 4 (au moins) sont préconisées ; leur temps moyen de brossage n’est que de 56 secondes, tandis que les recommandations sont de 2 minutes au minimum. De plus, 41 % des Français ne respectent pas la préconisation d’une visite annuelle chez le dentiste. Et s’il n’y avait que cela... Lors d’un brossage de dent, on ne nettoie que 60% de la surface des dents et 10 % de la cavité buccale.

Les mauvaises habitudes qu’adorent les mauvaises bactéries


Dans le mélange de compétition et de mutualisme qui régit l’écosystème bactérien dans la bouche, de nombreux facteurs interviennent. Pensez à tout ce que vous mettez dans votre bouche… Rien que sur le chapitre de l’alimentation, il faudrait déjà une encyclopédie pour en faire le tour. Mais il y a aussi la brosse à dents, qui peut vite devenir un véritable incubateur à bactéries. Il y a le dentifrice, dans lequel on trouve plus d’un ingrédient douteux comme le fluor ou le sodium lauryl sulfate, les bains de bouche aux formulations non moins hasardeuses, les médicaments, le stress, et puis les petites habitudes auxquelles on ne prête même pas attention, comme se ronger les ongles…


Le fait de fumer perturbe également la flore buccale. La professeure de parodontologie Kumar Purnima, de l’Ohio State University à Columbus, a mené une étude sur le rôle des communautés microbiennes dans l’apparition des maladies bucco-dentaires. Elle a pu constater que chez les fumeurs, les « bonnes bactéries » étaient rapidement décimées au profit des bactéries pathogènes. Les fumeurs présentent ainsi un niveau de cytokines (marqueurs de l’inflammation) sensiblement plus élevé que les non-fumeurs, signe qu’il y a lutte contre une infection.


C’est sans doute pourquoi les risques de parodontite sont en moyenne quatre fois plus élevés chez les fumeurs, et que le tabagisme est le facteur de risque le plus important du cancer de la bouche. Si les recherches n’ont pas encore permis de comprendre réellement les mécanismes et la portée de ces déséquilibres, notamment sur les maladies graves liées au tabagisme, la bonne nouvelle est qu’ils ne sont pas permanents, et qu’un ancien fumeur retrouve dans sa bouche un profil bactérien proche de celui d’un non-fumeur.


Plaque dentaire et flore pathogène : des dégâts dans la bouche et au-delà…


La plaque dentaire, vous en avez sûrement déjà entendu parler. Mais qu’est-ce que c’est ? C’est un milieu composé d’une matrice faite de protéines et de polysaccharides produits par les bactéries. Cette matrice sert de support aux colonies bactériennes et leur permet d’adhérer aux différentes surfaces (dents et muqueuses). Elle est riche en glucides, qui renforcent la cohésion de la plaque et constituent une réserve d’énergie pour les bactéries. Ces dernières ne représentent d’ailleurs que 15 à 20 % du volume de la plaque dentaire.


Un écosystème buccal en mauvais état peut générer la prolifération de certains micro-organismes particulièrement dangereux, susceptibles de migrer vers d’autres régions du corps. À l’origine d’inflammations de la gencive, ils attaquent également les dents et causent ainsi des caries. Des micro-organismes ainsi que des fragments de plaque dentaire se détachent régulièrement et peuvent ainsi causer des infections à distance, lorsqu’ils pénètrent le système circulatoire via des inflammations dentaires, des caries ou encore des abcès. Chez les femmes enceintes, l’inflammation des gencives augmente 7,5 fois le risque d’accoucher d’enfants prématurés ou de faible constitution. Et aujourd’hui, les preuves concernant la survenue du diabète et de divers problèmes intestinaux dans le cadre d’une inflammation des gencives se multiplient.


Ces infections parfois graves peuvent représenter un risque chez les personnes fatiguées, ou au système immunitaire affaibli. C’est alors la porte ouverte à des troubles sévères : maladies cellulaires, valvulopathies et endocardites infectieuses (dans le cas d’une pénétration massive de streptocoques dans les valvules cardiaques), athérosclérose (en particulier au niveau des carotides), mais aussi AVC, polyarthrite rhumatoïde ou encore troubles ORL et pulmonaires récurrents. Hippocrate, le père de la médecine, remarquait d’ailleurs déjà qu’enlever une dent en mauvais état soignait l’arthrite.


Sans aller aussi loin, les problèmes qui se cantonnent à la bouche sont déjà bien assez préoccupants. Ainsi en est-il par exemple de la stomatite dentaire, une réaction inflammatoire de la muqueuse de la bouche, en particulier au contact des prothèses dentaires amovibles. Cette maladie est multifactorielle, mais la mauvaise hygiène et le port continu de prothèses dentaires en sont les causes les plus fréquentes. Ces deux derniers facteurs conjugués facilitent la formation de la plaque dentaire, à laquelle on retrouve souvent associée le champignon Candida albicans, suggérant une association pathogène entre les bactéries buccales et les champignons.

Plus généralement, les mycoses, notamment sur la langue, les aphtes, les candidoses, la mauvaise haleine, les saignements persistants ou encore les rétractations de gencive sont les indices d’un probable déséquilibre du biofilm buccal, vraisemblablement assorti d’une infection. Il est alors urgent de consulter votre dentiste, mais aussi de corriger certaines de vos habitudes.

 

Fluor, bains de bouches et fil dentaire : ces solutions qui n’en sont pas

Si vous avez bien suivi tous les « gentils conseils » véhiculés depuis des années par la publicité avec l’acoquinement d’une certaine UFSBD (Union française pour la santé bucco-dentaire), vous utilisez un dentifrice au fluor pour toute la famille, peut-être un fil dentaire à l’occasion, vous vous brossez les dents deux fois par jour pendant deux minutes (eh oui, trois fois par jour pendant trois minutes, c’était avant) et finissez avec un rince-bouche. Vous mâchez aussi en toute bonne conscience un chewing-gum après un repas quand vous êtes à l’extérieur. 
Hélas, la plupart de ces recommandations sont davantage le fruit du marketing d’industriels trop influents que de données scientifiques fiables. Le dentifrice fluoré, par exemple, est présenté comme « la mesure d’hygiène individuelle la plus efficace pour prévenir la carie. Il permet la destruction de la plaque dentaire et du biofilm ».

En réalité, cette histoire de fluor est une sombre supercherie, car en même temps qu'il "protège", c’est un toxique puissant qui dénature les dents et les os, et contribue à la baisse de la fertilité. D’ailleurs, regardez en détail la liste des substances entrant dans la composition des dentifrices de grande diffusion, vous en tomberez des nues…Mais ce n’est pas tout. L’utilisation du fil dentaire ne fait pas non plus l’unanimité. Bien manipulé, dans une bouche saine, c’est un moyen efficace et peu onéreux (mais ô combien fastidieux) de compléter le brossage en accédant aux espaces que celui-ci n’atteint pas. Mais dans une bouche déjà « malsaine » qui présente éventuellement des signes d’infection, le fil dentaire peut être contre-productif et accentuer la propagation des mauvaises bactéries par le biais des blessures qu’il peut occasionner.


Les rince-bouches, avec leurs couleurs chatoyantes, ne sont pas pour autant des produits anodins. Des médecins mettent en garde : ils intègrent souvent de puissants antiseptiques tels que la chlorhexidine, qui ravagent complètement la population bactérienne sans distinction entre les bons et les mauvais éléments. Cela pose problème notamment au niveau de la tension artérielle, car les bactéries buccales nécessaires à la synthèse des nitrites sont ainsi éliminées. Une utilisation trop fréquente des bains de bouche alcoolisés pourrait également générer certains cancers de la cavité buccale et du larynx.

 

Puisqu’elle passe forcément par la bouche l’alimentation est encore le moyen le plus efficace d’améliorer la situation au quotidien. Choisissez des aliments qui apportent des nutriments de qualité (de préférence biologiques, et aussi peu transformés que possible) en quantités suffisantes. Ceux-ci ne nuiront pas à la bouche, et auront au contraire une influence très favorable, y compris sur le microbiote intestinal, centre névralgique de l’immunité. Limitez autant que possible les sucres, qui promeuvent la formation de la plaque dentaire et la prolifération des bactéries pathogènes. En cas de mycose buccale ou de stomatite, ou en hygiène d'appoint en cas de prothèse dentaire amovible, les bains de bouche à base de propolis, sont également une solution intéressante.


Petits plus qui peuvent faire une grande différence


Le scorbut est une relique de l’histoire pour les populations des pays développés, mais comme l’alimentation moderne peine de plus en plus à fournir suffisamment de nutriments essentiels, dont l’indispensable vitamine C, des situations de fragilisation « pré-scorbutiques » ne sont plus exceptionnelles, notamment chez les personnes âgées. Il peut donc se révéler utile de recourir à une supplémentation en vitamine C, voire à l’emploi occasionnel d’un complexe vitaminique plus complet.


La France est en retard sur l’élimination des amalgames dentaires au mercure (qui contiennent d’ailleurs plusieurs autres métaux comme l’argent, le cuivre, le zinc ou même le béryllium). En plus des dégâts qu’ils occasionnent ailleurs dans l’organisme, ils sont déjà très nocifs pour l’écosystème buccal. Il y a donc toujours urgence à les retirer et à les remplacer par les nouveaux matériaux dentaires plus neutres comme les composites ou implants en zircone. Pour rappel, les amalgames métalliques sont interdits depuis longtemps en Norvège, en Suède et au Danemark, et quasiment plus utilisés en Allemagne…


Au niveau des outils, la brosse à dents électrique me semble être une excellente solution, ne serait-ce que parce que sur la même durée de brossage, le nombre de passages des poils sur la surface des dents est nettement supérieur à celui d’une brosse manuelle. Le jet dentaire (ou hydropulseur) est également plus indiqué que le fil dentaire, car il est moins blessant, beaucoup plus facile à utiliser et souvent plus efficace. Reste la langue, laissée pour compte en Occident, alors qu’elle fait l’objet de soins quotidiens au même titre que les dents, dans d’autres cultures comme l’Inde ou la Chine.

Ces médecines ancestrales voient la langue comme le témoin de contrôle de certaines opérations du métabolisme comme la digestion. C’est aussi par elle que passent nos facultés gustatives et l’activation des enzymes digestives en fonction de ce qu’elle détecte. On a donc tout à gagner à bien la soigner. Ce qui peut passer par un grattage doux avec un ustensile spécial (« gratte langue », disponible en pharmacie) ou une simple petite cuillère. Trois ou quatre passages suffisent, le matin au réveil, en tirant la langue, et en prenant bien soin de rincer abondamment tout de suite après.

Des probiotiques au secours de notre bouche ?


L’intérêt des pro- et prébiotiques pour la bonne santé de la flore intestinale est maintenant bien connu. Il était donc presque logique que la question du microbiome buccal soit un jour abordée sous le même angle. C’est dans l’intention de redonner de la densité à la population des bonnes bactéries pour réduire le terrain de jeu des mauvaises et mieux les maintenir sous contrôle que quelques études (encore trop rares) ont tenté l’expérience.

Leur principal enseignement réside dans une réduction significative du nombre de bactéries Streptococcus mutans, variété reconnue comme l’une des principales responsables de la carie dentaire, grâce à une supplémentation en Lactobacillus paracasei. S. mutans. Naturellement présente dans la flore commensale de la cavité buccale, cette bactérie transforme le sucre en acide lactique qui attaque l’émail des dents. En limitant sa prolifération, et en réduisant parallèlement les apports en sucre par l’alimentation, on limite de façon significative le risque de carie.


Le laboratoire Pileje, par exemple, a innové récemment avec une présentation originale de l’une des variantes de la bactérie probiotique Lactobacillus paracasei sous forme de pastille à sucer. Comme pour le microbiote intestinal, ces probiotiques entrent en compétition avec les micro-organismes pathogènes dans la conquête des sites d’adhérence, aidant à mieux contrôler leur population et à moduler la réponse immunitaire face à de potentielles infections. D’autres bactéries, comme Lactobacillus Gasseri et L. fermentum, se révèlent efficaces pour limiter notamment la croissance des bactéries parodontopathogènes.

Au bout du compte, prendre soin de sa bouche et de son écosystème microbien n’est pas bien compliqué, ne coûte pas très cher, et peut éviter des ennuis très désagréables, puisque les affections les plus graves, notamment parodontales, nécessitent de grosses opérations de chirurgie. Alors mangez et buvez moins sucré, choisissez (ou faites vous-même) des produits d’hygiène mouth-friendly et n’ayez plus peur d’ouvrir la bouche !

Jean-Pierre Giess  rédigé le 05 juillet 2017

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Enquête

La maladie de Lyme, un calvaire aussi pour les médecins qui tentent un traitement long

Par Pascal Marie Publié le 13/05/2017

Respecter les règles et ne pas soigner les malades ou les enfreindre et risquer la sanction, c’est le dilemme imposé aux médecins français face à la maladie de Lyme.

Un plan d’action a été lancé par le ministère de la Santé pour mettre à jour les pratiques de soin de cette pathologie difficile à détecter.

« La grande simulatrice ».

C'est ainsi qu'est surnommée la maladie de Lyme, coupable de présenter les mêmes symptômes que beaucoup d’autres pathologies.

Conséquence, pour les patients qui en souffrent et les médecins qui voudraient les soigner, résumée par l'un de ces derniers :

« Si un patient présente toujours des symptômes après plusieurs mois et qu’on lui donne un traitement, la Caisse primaire d'assurance maladie considère que l’on soigne des gens qui ne sont pas malades ».

La maladie de Lyme cristallise ainsi des tensions entre les médecins, leur hiérarchie et la communauté scientifique.

Principalement transmise par les piqûres de tiques et considérée jusqu’à il y a peu comme une maladie rare, elle touche en fait des millions de personnes dans le monde.

Atteints de maux de tête, de fièvre et de troubles bénins au premier abord, les malades de Lyme peuvent ensuite subir des douleurs articulaires atroces voire, à terme, des paralysies.

La maladie de Lyme souvent considérée comme psychiatrique

Si des découvertes récentes ont permis d’élaborer de nouveaux traitements, en France, les médecins sont toujours tenus de respecter les dispositions prévues par un protocole établi… en 2006.

Un protocole dont beaucoup pointent aujourd’hui l'obsolescence, principalement parce qu'il ne reconnaît pas le caractère chronique de la maladie de Lyme.

C’est là tout le nœud du problème : passé un certain délai, on considère bien souvent la maladie comme psychiatrique et non infectieuse.

Et ce, en dépit des conclusions de plusieurs études scientifiques internationales.

Outrepassant les règles françaises, des médecins décident de faire suivre à leurs patients des traitements antibiotiques plus de trois semaines après le début des symptômes.

Au risque d’être lourdement sanctionnés car ce protocole n’est pas autorisé par la Caisse primaire d'assurance maladie (CPAM).

C’est le cas du docteur Philippe Bottéro, médecin généraliste à Nyons, dans la Drôme :

« On m’accuse d’être un médecin dangereux, d’être un idéologue.

On me dit que si mes patients vont mieux, c’est juste dans leurs têtes ».

Condamné en janvier 2016 par la CPAM de Rhône-Alpes à six mois d’interdiction d’exercer, dont quatre avec sursis, le docteur Bottéro est toujours dans l’attente de la décision définitive :

« J’ai fait appel. Il est suspensif donc je vais être rejugé devant l’Ordre national des médecins à Paris mais je ne sais pas encore quand je serai convoqué ».

"80% des malades se sentent mieux"

En tout, six professionnels sont actuellement poursuivis dans le pays.

Les conseils de l’Ordre des médecins, saisi par les CPAM, leur reprochent d’avoir prescrit des traitements antibiotiques injustifiés, voire d’être des charlatans. «

Dès que quelqu’un sort des clous, il est sanctionné », nous résume un médecin.

Certains vont même jusqu’à parler de « chasse aux sorcières ».

A la lecture de leurs états de service, les praticiens condamnés n'ont pourtant guère le profil d'imposteurs.

Le docteur Bottéro, qui exerce depuis 34 ans, est un pionnier dans le domaine des maladies infectieuses, auteur de publications internationales. Il a également cofondé Chronimed, groupe scientifique spécialisé sur cette question, en collaboration avec le prix Nobel de médecine Luc Montagnier, découvreur du virus du Sida.

« J’ai traité mon premier cas en 1979, indique-t-il.

Les poursuites sont assez récentes : depuis 2005, il y a une controverse au niveau international sur ce sujet.

Des statistiques démontrent pourtant que le bénéfice risque de certains traitements antibiotiques prolongés est positif ».

Si les mentalités évoluent à l’étranger, le blocage est encore total en France. Pour preuve, le déroulé ubuesque de l’enquête qu’a subie le médecin drômois :

« Les médecins-conseils, qui enquêtent pour le compte des CPAM, ont interrogé seize patients que je suivais, tous atteints de la maladie de Lyme.

Ils se sont évidemment rendu compte que je leur avais prescrit des traitements supérieurs à la moyenne.

Mais ils ont eux-mêmes reconnu que la majorité d’entre eux se sentaient nettement mieux aujourd’hui ! ».

Un constat qui n’empêchera pourtant pas sa condamnation quelques semaines plus tard :

« Lorsque j’ai été convoqué fin 2015 devant la caisse départementale à Valence, les médecins-conseils n’ont curieusement pas fait mention de l’étude statistique qui démontre que 80% des malades se sentent mieux après un traitement antibiotique prolongé.

Ils n’ont pas non plus tenu compte des études américaines et allemandes publiées récemment, ni de celles du professeur Perronne ».

"Arrêter de persécuter les médecins"

Figure de la recherche scientifique dans le domaine des maladies infectieuses, le professeur Christian Perronne était venu en personne défendre le docteur Bottéro.

Depuis plusieurs semaines, avec des associations de malades et des médecins-chercheurs, il travaille, au sein d'un plan d’action initié par le ministère de la Santé, à l’actualisation des connaissances et à la généralisation de certaines pratiques.

« Il n’y a pas de position au niveau national.

Des médecins libéraux n’osent pas traiter les malades, d’autres sont poursuivis alors que même les autorités de santé semblent assez convaincues aujourd’hui de la chronicité de la maladie de Lyme ».

Le professeur Perronne fait de l’arrêt des poursuites contre les médecins l’une des priorités du plan d’action :

« On ne réglera pas le problème dans son entier en cinq minutes mais arrêter de persécuter les médecins, cela peut être fait dès maintenant ».

Autre point à faire évoluer pour le professeur Perronne, la détection même de la pathologie.

« Il n’y a jamais eu de tests fiables.

Le péché originel, c’est la sérologie.

On l’a calibrée en se basant sur des donneurs de sang en bonne santé.

Le test de référence, appelé test Elisa, est non seulement peu fiable mais il est incapable de détecter les autres microbes souvent associés à celui de la maladie de Lyme.

Aujourd’hui, il est bon à jeter à la poubelle ».

De plus, les tests ont été élaborés à partir de souches américaines.

Or, les bactéries européennes ne présentent pas exactement les mêmes caractéristiques que leurs cousines d’outre-Atlantique. «

Un médecin écossais a démontré que les souches britanniques étaient différentes et n’étaient donc pas détectées par le test, précise le professeur Perronne.

Suite à cette découverte, des patients envoyés en soins psychiatriques ont enfin pu être considérés comme des vrais malades ».

Des malades doivent se faire passer pour des chiens ou des chats

Prouver qu’un malade est bel et bien infecté par une borrélie, la bactérie vectrice de la maladie de Lyme, n’est pas chose aisée mais le professeur Perronne se désespère que l’on ne fasse pas appel à des tests plus fiables.

« Il y a des tests performants dans les laboratoires vétérinaires.

Des malades doivent se faire passer pour des chiens ou des chats afin d'y avoir accès !

Cela a été remarqué et dénoncé, alors qu’il faudrait simplement adapter ces tests à des laboratoires de biologie humaine ».

Selon des chiffres confirmés par les médecins, environ 100 à 200 généralistes soigneraient en France les malades de Lyme en-dehors du cadre prévu par le protocole de 2006.

Un nombre auquel il faut associer six infectiologues exerçant en milieu hospitalier.

Parmi ces derniers, le docteur Raouf Ghozzi, bras droit du professeur Perronne et rattaché au centre hospitalier de Lannemezan, dans les Hautes-Pyrénées.

Bien que connu « comme le loup blanc » dans sa région, lui non plus n’a jamais été inquiété.

« En médecine hospitalière, il est plus difficile d’accéder aux prescriptions que l’on donne, nous explique-t-il.

Mais depuis mai 2016, on nous demande de faire une déclaration supplémentaire pour toute médication donnée en perfusion.

On peut largement penser que c’est un moyen détourné pour nous surveiller… ».

Arrivé en 2011 à Lannemezan, Dr. Ghozzi est convaincu des bienfaits des traitements antibiotiques prolongés. «

Quand je suis arrivé au centre, ma direction m’a demandé de m’occuper des cas de Lyme classiques.

En donnant des traitements plus longs, j’ai été très favorablement surpris par les résultats.

Et ce n’est qu’une porte ouverte vers de nouvelles connaissances dans le domaine médical ».

Mais si l’infectiologue bénéficie de la confiance de sa direction, ce n’est pas le cas de ses collègues.

« Il y a aussi des sanctions en interne. Je me souviens de l’expérience vécue par une de mes consœurs qui exerce dans un CHU de la région Rhône-Alpes.

Elle suivait un patient victime de douleurs intenses et chez qui l’on soupçonnait une maladie de Lyme.

Le test Elisa s’est avéré positif, on a pratiqué une ponction lombaire mais les résultats définitifs n’ont rien pu prouver définitivement.

Sa hiérarchie l’a obligée à en rester là ».

Des spécialistes débordés et des malades au désespoir Le docteur Raouf Ghozzi attend lui aussi beaucoup des conclusions du plan d’action en cours d'élaboration.

La mise à jour des connaissances est indispensable car selon son estimation, « 60 à 70 % des infectiologues français sont en questionnement sur le sujet et attendent des résultats scientifiques ».

Pendant ce temps, les médecins qui comme lui traitent la maladie de Lyme sont submergés par les demandes de patients :

« En général, un médecin hospitalier effectue 500 consultations par an. J’en réalise environ 1.900 dont 80% concernent la maladie de Lyme ».

Le professeur Perronne décrit la même situation :

« Je reçois entre 25 et 30 demandes par jour, venant du monde entier.

En seulement deux mois, j’ai rempli une étagère de trois mètres de large et ça déborde. Je n’ai même pas le temps d’ouvrir tous les courriers recommandés que je reçois ».

"Je reçois entre 25 et 30 demandes par jour"

Car les patients se trouvent parfois dans le désespoir le plus total.

En moyenne, un malade de Lyme tenterait ainsi de se suicider par semaine, selon l’association le Droit de guérir.

Le faible nombre de médecins qui recourent aux traitements de longue durée les pousse bien souvent à devoir parcourir des centaines de kilomètres pour être soignés.

Selon les régions ou les départements, la sévérité de la CPAM ne semble en effet pas la même.

Cette impression, le professeur Christian Perronne la partage et il n’est pas le seul : « Certaines caisses départementales sont plus rigides que d’autres.

En général celles où il y a le plus de cas, en Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes et en Alsace surtout ».

De fait, trois des six médecins actuellement poursuivis exercent en Rhône-Alpes.

En Alsace, où se trouve le centre français de référence sur les maladies auto-immunes, partisans du statu quo et scientifiques en quête de nouveaux traitements s’opposent.

Le procès de la biologiste Viviane Schaller et du pharmacologue Bernard Christophe, en décembre 2016, en est l’illustration.

Viviane Schaller avait mis au point des tests pour détecter la maladie de Lyme en se basant sur des travaux reconnus en Allemagne.

Elle a été condamnée à neuf mois de prison avec sursis, pour « escroquerie » au préjudice de l’Assurance maladie.

Une peine particulièrement lourde qui avait surpris beaucoup d’observateurs, à commencer par le professeur Perronne.

Quant à Bernard Christophe, décédé trois jours avant son procès, il avait mis au point un produit à base d’huiles essentielles, le Tic-Tox, pour soigner les malades.

Ce produit a été considéré comme dangereux, à cause d’un taux beaucoup trop élevé de sauge, une plante potentiellement toxique.

Pourtant selon le professeur Perronne, « l’expert aurait fait une erreur dans son rapport.

Le taux de sauge aurait été largement surévalué, on a peut-être cherché un prétexte…

En attendant, le Tic-Tox est toujours vendu à l‘étranger ».

Et de nombreux malades français traversent le Rhin pour s'en procurer en Allemagne.

Un plan d’action qui n’a pas le droit d’échouer

Sous la pression d’associations de malades et de la Fédération française contre les maladies vectorielles à tiques (FFMVT), le ministère de la Santé a enfin décidé de faire avancer le dossier. Vice-président de France Lyme, Pierre Hecker souligne la nécessite de mettre en place ce futur plan d’action :

« On a demandé aux associations de faire beaucoup d’efforts, de travailler en lien avec des médecins, de ne pas être dans l’opposition mais dans la participation.

Nous l’avons fait, maintenant il faut arriver au consensus ».

Plus récente, l’association le Droit de Guérir, présidé par Matthias Lacoste, ne fonde toutefois aucun espoir dans cette initiative.

Début avril, des membres du collectif ont tenté, sans succès, de planter des tentes devant le ministère pour faire valoir son point de vue :

« On ne parle pas des autres modes de transmission, on veut mettre en place des traitements généralisés alors que ce n’est pas possible, rien n’a été fait à ce jour pour la formation des médecins… ».

Matthias Lacoste souffre de la maladie de Lyme mais dans son cas, ce n’est en effet pas à cause d’une tique.

Contaminé dans le ventre de sa mère, il souffre depuis sa naissance.

« On m’avait d'abord diagnostiqué une 'spondylarthrite ankylosante'.

J’ai vécu treize années d’errance médicale avant de rencontrer un médecin qui a su détecter la maladie de Lyme.

Quand il a lu mon dossier, il m’a dit que les médecins qui m’avaient traité jusque-là étaient fous ! ».

Il y a quelques années seulement, Matthias Lacoste a enfin pu se voir prescrire un traitement adapté. Après des mois plus que difficiles, il commence enfin à sentir de nettes améliorations.

Au-delà du plan d’action, le professeur Christian Perronne est fermement convaincu qu’un pas a été franchi ces dernières années dans la reconnaissance de la maladie de Lyme.

Reste à savoir combien de temps cela prendra pour que la prise de conscience se transforme en actes :

« Le processus ne pourra plus s’arrêter, maintenant.

On commence à vraiment investir de l’argent, aux Etats-Unis notamment. Il faut réussir à convaincre les collègues les plus rigides avec un débat constructif ».

Associations et médecins impliqués veulent se montrer confiants mais redoutent la déception, un point sur lequel insiste Pierre Hecker :

« L’annonce du plan d’action a suscité beaucoup d’espoir mais si en septembre, les avancées ne nous conviennent pas, cette fois nous irons dans la rue ».

Aux Etats-Unis, les médecins qui étaient encore récemment poursuivis sont devenus en quelques mois des références…

Leurs homologues français connaîtront-ils bientôt le même retournement de situation ?

La maladie de Lyme, un calvaire aussi pour les médecins qui tentent un traitement long. Cas du docteur Philippe Bottéro.
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MORSURE.

Vous ne regarderez peut-être plus votre chat de la même manière...

Le Japon a confirmé cette un possible premier cas de transmission d'un mammifère à l'humain d'un dangereux virus, appelé SFTS et initialement véhiculé par des tiques, après le décès en 2016 d'une femme mordue par un chat errant.

La femme agée d'une cinquantaine d'années est décédée environ dix jours après avoir conduit le félin malade chez le vétérinaire.

Or, des analyses récentes réalisées par les autorités sanitaires ont découvert qu'elle avait contracté la maladie SFTS (syndrome de fièvre sévère avec thrombocytopénie), et ce malgré l'absence de trace de piqûre de tique sur son corps.

Un taux de mortalité de 20% pour une maladie qu'on ne sait pas soigner

Cette infection, apparue relativement récemment en Asie (Japon, Chine et Corée du sud), est diagnostiquée chaque année sur environ 60 patients dans l'archipel nippon, avec un taux de mortalité d'environ 20%, selon le ministère de la Santé japonais.

"Jusqu'à présent, aucun cas de transmission d'un mammifère à l'homme n'avait été rapporté", a indiqué une porte-parole du ministère.

"Il n'est pas encore confirmé que le virus vienne bien du chat, mais il est possible que ce soit le premier cas mondial" de transmission horizontale d'espèce à espèce, sans nouvelle piqûre de tique.

VIGILANCE.

Aucun traitement ou vaccin n'est pour l'instant disponible contre le SFTS, un syndrome qui se manifeste par une forte fièvre, des vomissements, des diarrhées, des troubles comportementaux, voire une défaillance multiviscérale voire "Le meilleur moyen de réduire le risque d'infection est d'éviter de se faire piquer par des tiques", rappelle le ministère nippon qui a demandé aux habitants de redoubler de vigilance en ne caressant pas les animaux suspects.

Mais qu'on se rassure : cette étrange maladie émergente n'a pour l'instant jamais été détectée en Europe.

S.S. avec AFP

Elle meurt d'une maladie vectorielle à tiques, mordue par un chat.
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Virus SFTS : le baiser mortel du chat sauvage au Japon.

 
Sciences et Avenir note en effet que « le Japon a confirmé un possible premier cas de transmission d'un mammifère à l'humain d'un dangereux virus, appelé SFTS et initialement véhiculé par des tiques, après le décès en 2016 d'une femme mordue par un chat errant ».

Le magazine explique que « la femme âgée d'une cinquantaine d'années est décédée environ 10 jours après avoir conduit le félin malade chez le vétérinaire.
 
Or, des analyses récentes réalisées par les autorités sanitaires ont découvert qu'elle avait contracté la maladie SFTS (syndrome de fièvre sévère avec thrombocytopénie), et ce malgré l'absence de trace de piqûre de tique sur son corps ».
Sciences et Avenir observe que « cette infection, apparue relativement récemment en Asie (Japon, Chine et Corée du sud), est diagnostiquée chaque année sur environ 60 patients dans l'archipel nippon, avec un taux de mortalité d'environ 20% ».
 
Une porte-parole du ministère de la Santé japonais a souligné que « jusqu'à présent, aucun cas de transmission d'un mammifère à l'homme n'avait été rapporté. […] Il n'est pas encore confirmé que le virus vienne bien du chat, mais il est possible que ce soit le premier cas mondial ».

Sciences et Avenir rappelle qu’« aucun traitement ou vaccin n'est pour l'instant disponible contre le SFTS, un syndrome qui se manifeste par une forte fièvre, des vomissements, des diarrhées, des troubles comportementaux, voire une défaillance multiviscérale ».

Le ministère a indiqué que « le meilleur moyen de réduire le risque d'infection est d'éviter de se faire piquer par des tiques », et « a demandé aux habitants de redoubler de vigilance en ne caressant pas les animaux suspects », ajoute le magazine, qui conclut que « cette étrange maladie émergente n'a pour l'instant jamais été détectée en Europe ».
 
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ANTICORPS.

Et s'il s'agissait d'une des clés dans la lutte contre l'épidémie ?

Les anticorps neutralisants à large spectre (bNAbs) sont capables de bloquer la réplication du virus de l'immunodéficience humaine (VIH) en empêchant notamment les particules virales de se lier aux cellules saines.

Sans ce "rapprochement" le virus ne peut plus se dupliquer et l'organisme peut ainsi contrôler l'infection.

Ces anticorps neutralisants, produits naturellement chez certains patients infectés, ont de plus l'intérêt d'être efficaces sur une grande variété de souches , plusieurs années après la primo-infection.

Leur potentiel dans la lutte contre le Sida a fait naître beaucoup d'espoirs mais les chercheurs se heurtaient jusqu'alors à un obstacle : la difficulté à enclencher la production de ces anticorps chez l'homme comme chez les animaux (souris et singes) qui servent habituellement de modèles pour étudier ce virus.

Des résultats significatifs chez les bovins Aussi, les biologistes ont entrepris d'élargir leurs études à d'autres espèces comme les lapins, les lamas et tout récemment les bovins.

C'est chez ces derniers que des résultats prometteurs ont été obtenus par une équipe internationale menée par Devin Sok, du Scripps Research Institute.

Ils font l'objet d'une publication dans la revue Nature. Les scientifiques y annoncent avoir réussi à faire produire à quatre veaux âgés de six mois des bNAbs après leur avoir injecté une protéine appelée BG505 SOSIP, qui a été conçue pour imiter les parties stables de l'enveloppe du virus du VIH.

Un des animaux a commencé à produire des anticorps capables de neutraliser 20 % des 117 sous-types de virus testés 42 jours après l'injection de la protéine et au bout de 381 jours, les anticorps étaient efficaces sur 96 % des souches testées !

MODÈLE ANIMAL.

Bien qu'encourageants, ces résultats n'auront pour autant pas d'applications immédiates chez l'homme.

Le système immunitaire des bovins est en effet très différent de celui des humains et ce sont sans doute ces différences qui expliquent leur réponse rapide et très efficace dirigée contre la protéine injectée. Néanmoins, l'analyse de la structure de ces bNAbs bovins et leur comparaison avec ceux produits chez les humains sera riche d'enseignements.

L'étude prouve en tout cas que les vaches peuvent constituer, au même titre que les souris ou les singes, un modèle animal pertinent pour étudier les maladies virales afin de concevoir des sérums, ou à plus long terme, des vaccins.

Un vaccin contre le Sida? Anticorps de vache.
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Le Dr Pascal Delaunay DELAUNAY Pascal Dr Pascal DELAUNAY est qu'un Biologiste médical spécialisée en parasitologie, mycologie et en entomologie.

Dans le laboratoire du CHU Nice, il connaît tous les aspects appliqués à la santé publique.

Il s'efforce de développer le domaine de l'entomologie médicale et environnementale pour les médecins, les patients et les gestionnaires de parasites.

Ses thèmes de recherche sont la leishmaniose et le paludisme en parasitologie et Cimex lectularius, Aedes albopictus et Pyemotes sp. acariens en entomologie.

Programme de recherche gestionnaire intitulé « Cimex lectularius ou Punaise de lits : vecteur d'agents infectieux et rôle pathogène "financé par PHRC 2009-2012 du Ministère Français de la santé.

Il assiste État et gouvernements nationaux dans la planification de punaises de lit et les infestations de moustiques tigre.

Il est impliqué dans les risques d'épidémie chikungunya et dengue pour les services de santé l'Etat Français.

Punaises de lit. Dr Delaunay. Bed Bug Foundation.
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26 juillet 2017 3 26 /07 /juillet /2017 11:49

Lu sur le JIM (article sur Lyme) une intervention du Pr A. Muller de Strasbourg, spécialiste de la douleur chronique (en PJ un article "le patient a toujours raison"), que je vous recopie ci dessous :

"Les antibiotiques recommandés, ceftriaxone et minocycline ont des effets antalgiques propres.

Le premier en agissant sur le transport du glutamate synaptique, le second en bloquant l'activation des cellules microgliales.

Or glutamate et microglie sont des éléments perennisants des douleurs chroniques, et peuvent donc atténuer des douleurs diffusés apparaissant parfois après un Lyme.

D'où sans doute l'idée que s'ils soulagent, c'est qu'il y a infection chronique. "

Co-infections et maladie de Lyme: Les antibiotiques recommandés, ceftriaxone et minocycline ont des effets antalgiques propres.

J'ai lu cet article et la réponse du Pr Muller il y a un mois de cela et cela m'a confirmé ce que j'avais pu lire ailleurs. Il y a quelques temps j'avais posé la question à philippe sur les effets non bactériologiques des tétracyclines et entre autre son effet immunomodulateur et son effet anti-inflammatoire ce qui en fait un traitement intéressant pour certains parkinson ou sep au début.

Par exemple je vous fais passer ce lien d'une thèse intéressante il faut lire les pages de 75 à 89.

Dr François Berne
https://tel.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-00748807/document

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23 juillet 2017 7 23 /07 /juillet /2017 11:49

Répulsif moustiques

Le baume du tigre est également un répulsif contre les moustiques et autres insectes (comme les tiques?).

Aussi, dès les premières vagues de moustiques, n'hésitez pas à vous passer un peu de baume du tigre sur les bras et les jambes.

Grâce aux ingrédients qu'il contient - camphre, menthol, eucalyptus - les moustiques resteront à distance de vous et vous ne serez plus piqué !

Si toutefois, certains sauront se montrer coriaces, vous pourrez utiliser le baume du tigre pour soulager vos démangeaisons.

Afin de soulager vos piqures, massez la zone concernée avec un peu de baume du tigre et la chaleur du produit anihilera rapidement toute envie de se gratter.

Le baume du tigre sera votre allié de taille pendant les périodes où sévissent moustiques et insectes.

Un répulsif contre insectes et moustiques. Le baume du tigre .
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