Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
11 avril 2012 3 11 /04 /avril /2012 07:16
Cognitive impairments linked to oxidative stress in psychosis patients MedWire News : Results from a Spanish study suggest that peripheral biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation can predict cognitive function in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP). Writing in Schizophrenia Research , Mónica Martínez-Cengotitabengoa (Santiago Hospital, Vitoria) and team explain that oxidative stress is involved in neurodegeneration and the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases. More specifically, they note, "inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines, which can tip the redox balance into a pro-oxidant state, are altered in patients with schizophrenia". To investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and neurocognitive deficits in psychosis patients, the team studied 28 FEP patients and 28 age-, gender-, and education-matched mentally healthy individuals (controls). Blood samples were collected from the participants and assessed for total antioxidant status (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase, lipid peroxidation, nitrites, and the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). The participants also underwent comprehensive cognitive assessments of attention, processing speed, working memory, and executive function. In the case of the FEP patients, these assessments were conducted 6 months after starting treatment when all had achieved remission. The researchers found that FEP patients had a significantly lower TAS than controls, as well as significantly lower levels of CAT and glutathione peroxidase, at 2695.15 versus 4262.79 U/mL, and 148.18 versus 329.47 mmol/mL, respectively. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding levels of SOD, GSH, lipid peroxidation, nitrites, and MCP-1, however. In FEP patients, linear regression analysis revealed that there were significant negative associations between MCP-1 levels and learning and memory, after adjustment for atypical antipsychotic use at admission and at the time of cognitive assessment. Furthermore, nitrite levels were significantly and negatively associated with executive function in FEP patients, while glutathione levels were positively associated with executive function. Martínez-Cengotitabengoa and colleagues conclude: "Our results show an association between peripheral inflammatory/oxidative markers and certain cognitive function domains at 6 months after a first psychotic episode." They add: "Further studies of the role of the chemokine MCP-1 in psychosis are warranted." By Mark Cowen 29/03/2012
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Concept
commenter cet article
11 avril 2012 3 11 /04 /avril /2012 07:09
Study sheds light on pathway from stress to inflammation MedWire News : US-Canadian researchers have developed and tested a model to illustrate a hypothetical pathway by which chronic stress can lead, via glucocorticoid receptor resistance (GCR), to systemic inflammation. "Because inflammation plays an important role in the onset and progression of a wide range of diseases, this model may have broad implications for understanding the role of stress in health," remark Sheldon Cohen (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) and co-authors in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . Cohen et al's model proposes that chronic stress leads to GCR, a condition characterized by reduced sensitivity of the immune cells that normally terminate the inflammatory response. Without sufficient glucocorticoid regulation, the duration and/or intensity of the inflammatory response increases, heightening the risk for exacerbations of acute disease (such as asthma and autoimmune conditions) as well as for the onset and progression of chronic inflammation diseases (such as cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes). To test their model, Cohen's team performed two "viral-challenge" studies. First, they enrolled 276 healthy adult volunteers, exposed them to one of two rhinoviruses, and monitored them for 5 days for signs and symptoms of the common cold. After controlling for confounding variables, volunteers who reported recently experiencing a major stressful life event had an increased risk for developing a cold following virus exposure, at an odds ratio of 1.99 versus nonstressed individuals. In the second experiment, 79 individuals were exposed to a rhinovirus and then their nasal secretions were monitored for 5 days for levels of proinflammatory cytokines. In this cohort, GCR levels at baseline were significantly and positively correlated with subsequent cytokine production. Based on their results, Cohen et al propose that exposure to a major stressful life event can result in GCR, which, in turn, would interfere with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis downregulation of local proinflammatory cytokine response to an infectious agent. "Without appropriate cortisol regulation of the local cytokine response, there would be an exaggerated expression of the signs of upper respiratory infections, which are generated by the proinflammatory response," they remark. They add: "Future research on GCR would benefit from quantification of GR subtypes, whose relative abundance might underlie the findings observed here." 05/04/2012
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Concept
commenter cet article
11 avril 2012 3 11 /04 /avril /2012 06:55
La population amish est composée de familles arrivées aux Etats-Unis au 18ème siècle depuis la Suisse. Elle est constituée de larges fratries et pratique une agriculture traditionnelle. Une étude a comparé la prévalence, dans la population amish, de l'asthme, du rhume des foins et de la sensibilisation allergique par rapport à celle observée en Suisse. Près de 29 000 questionnaires ont été remis à des familles suisses ayant des enfants âgés de 6 à 12 ans puis des prick-tests cutanés et un dosage d'IgE spécifiques ont été pratiqués dans un échantillon de cette population. Des familles amish ont répondu parallèlement à un questionnaire modifié et des prick-tests cutanés ont été pratiqués chez les enfants. Le taux le plus bas d'asthme, 5,2 %, a été trouvé chez les amish, contre 6,8 % chez les enfants suisses élevés dans une ferme et 11,3 % chez les enfants élevés en dehors d'une ferme en Suisse. La sensibilisation allergénique était de 7,2 % chez les enfants amish mais de 25,2 % chez les enfants des fermes en Suisse et de 44,2 % chez les enfants suisses non élevés dans une ferme. L'exposition aux animaux de la ferme et au lait non pasteurisé et non homogénéisé pourrait être des facteurs clés de cette protection contre l'allergie. Un autre travail mené aux Etats-Unis confirme le rôle de l'environnement dans la survenue de l'allergie. Il s'agit d'une étude sur la relation entre allergie et exposition d'enfants (âgés de 6 à 18 ans) à certains produits chimiques tels que bisphénol A, triclosan et 4-tert-octophényl. Aucune corrélation n'a été mise en évidence lorsque l'on considérait ces substances dans leur ensemble. Par contre, les taux urinaires de triclosan (utilisé dans certains topiques) étaient significativement associés à une sensibilisation aux aéroallergènes et aux allergènes alimentaires (présence d'IgE spécifiques). L'action antimicrobienne du triclosan pourrait être en cause. Une étude sur questionnaire menée en Corée sur 1 828 enfants âgés de 9 à 12 ans va dans le même sens. Elle a montré que l'utilisation d'antibiotiques pendant la petite enfance était significativement associée avec le développement de rhinite allergique et d'eczéma. Une relation significative entre certaines variations du génotype et l'utilisation des antibiotiques a par ailleurs été mise en évidence. Les résultats de ces différents travaux montrent qu'une interaction entre gènes et environnement joue probablement un rôle dans le développement de l'allergie. Dr Geneviève Démonet (10/04/2012) Holbreich M et coll. : The Prevalence of Asthma, Hay Fever and Allergic Sensitization in Amish Children. American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) (Orlando) : 2-6 mars 2012. Savage JH : Triclosan, a Common Ingredient in Household Products, is Associated With Allergic Sensitization. American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) (Orlando) : 2-6 mars 2012. Seo J et coll. : Gene-Environment Interaction Between Early Life Exposure and CD14, TLR4, IL13 in Development of Allergic Diseases or Atopy ? American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) (Orlando) : 2-6 mars 2012.
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Concept
commenter cet article
10 avril 2012 2 10 /04 /avril /2012 13:21
Central nervous system regeneration does not occur L S Illis1 1Willow Pond House, Lymore Valley, Hampshire, UK Abstract Objectives: To examine the state of research in central nervous system (CNS) regeneration and to suggest an alternative to the sterile research at the lesion site. Setting: Worldwide. Methods: A search of publications using ‘PubMed’ and a search of the historical literature relevant to CNS regeneration, biological models, the neurone theory, collateral sprouting, spinal shock and the central pattern generator. Results: There is no evidence for CNS regeneration. Conclusion: A century of research focussed on the lesion site has been unproductive. An alternative field of research must be developed and the best candidate is the undamaged CNS. Spinal Cord (2012) 50, 259–263; doi:10.1038/sc.2011.132; published online 22 November 2011 Correspondence: Dr LS Illis, Willow Pond House, Lymore Valley, Milford-On-Sea, Lymington, Hampshire SO41 0TW, UK. E-mail: lee@illis.co.uk Received 6 May 2011; Revised 3 October 2011; Accepted 4 October 2011
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Concept
commenter cet article
10 avril 2012 2 10 /04 /avril /2012 13:00
Selon une étude américaine parue dans Pediatrics, « les mères obèses ou diabétiques durant la grossesse sont plus susceptibles de donner naissance à un enfant autiste ou rencontrant des retards de développement ». les chercheurs « ont examiné 1 004 couples mère-enfant issus d'horizons socio-économiques les plus divers en Californie. Environ la moitié des enfants du groupe étaient autistes, 172 étaient atteints de troubles du développement et 315 étaient considérés comme normaux. il est ainsi 67% plus probable qu'une mère obèse mette au monde un enfant autiste qu'une femme au poids considéré comme normal. Elle est aussi deux fois plus susceptible d'avoir un enfant atteint d'un trouble quelconque du développement qu'une mère au poids normal et qui ne souffre pas de diabète ». « plus de 20% des mères ayant un enfant autiste ou atteint d'un retard de développement étaient obèses pendant la grossesse. Tandis que 14% des mères ayant eu des enfants normaux étaient obèses lors de la grossesse ». Les auteurs écrivent que ces résultats « sont porteurs de sérieuses préoccupations en termes de santé publique ». « le mois dernier, les autorités sanitaires américaines avaient révélé que le nombre de cas d'autisme diagnostiqués chez les enfants américains avait augmenté de 23% de 2006 à 2008, pour s'établir à 1 sur 88 en moyenne ».
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
8 avril 2012 7 08 /04 /avril /2012 08:06
« Traitez les êtres comme s’ils étaient ce qu’ils devraient être et vous les aiderez à devenir ce qu’ils peuvent être. » (Goethe) Lors des Jeux Olympiques de Pékin, en 2008, le nageur américain Michael Phelps devient le recordman du nombre de médailles d’or : 8, durant une seule session de JO ! Il explique comment sa mère l’aurait dirigé, très jeune, vers la natation dans un but initialement « sédatif » : affublé en effet d’un diagnostic précoce de « trouble déficitaire de l’attention avec hyperactivité », Michael Phelps commence à pratiquer la natation dès l’âge de sept ans, pour suivre ses sœurs et surtout pour « essayer de canaliser son excès d’énergie ; il éclot rapidement dans ce sport et à 10 ans, il y détient un record national dans sa catégorie ». Or ce syndrome ‘‘ADHD’’ (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, trouble de l’attention avec hyperactivité, appellation rendue en français par ‘‘TDAH’’, trouble déficitaire de l’attention avec hyperactivité) correspond-il, malgré une telle vertu « olympique », à une réalité ou à un mythe de la nosographie ? Car si les diagnostics psychiatriques sont souvent contestés, même entre pairs (rappelons ainsi les divergences fréquentes entre experts mandatés dans des affaires médico-légales), rares sont les sujets suscitant des positions aussi tranchantes. Pour ses adversaires, le TDAH serait carrément une « invention de laboratoires pharmaceutiques » ayant « fabriqué une nouvelle maladie » ad hoc pour étendre le marché d’un médicament réservé auparavant à la seule médecine vétérinaire, un calmant pour les chiens agités ! Pour ses partisans, il s’agirait au contraire d’une véritable affection, en grande partie responsable du naufrage scolaire observé chez certains élèves « décrocheurs. » Et à l’heure où l’excellence dès la maternelle semble un gage présumé de réussite future, dans un monde de plus en plus compétitif (tel l’« univers impitoyable » du feuilleton télévisé Dallas), on comprend que certains parents s’empressent de « médicaliser » l’échec scolaire de leur enfant (annonciateur de déboires financiers), au mépris du « droit à la différence ». Comme le médicament utilisé pour calmer est (contre toute attente) un produit psycho-stimulant, ce contre-emploi apparent contribue aussi à nourrir la controverse éthique et médicale sur la réalité nosographique de l’hyperactivité et sur l’intérêt de donner des médicaments psychotropes dès l’enfance : pourquoi prescrire un stimulant dans cette indication a priori paradoxale ? Une visée sédative ? Les partisans de ce traitement le justifient par son action ciblée sur le déficit de l’attention (le trouble primaire), cette restauration prioritaire de l’attention (psycho-stimulation) apaisant par ricochet le trouble secondaire (l’hyperactivité). Mais notre société a-t-elle le droit d’imposer (si besoin par une prescription médicamenteuse) une « norme » supposée de l’attention ? Jacques Prévert et Joseph Kosma pourraient-ils encore offrir aujourd’hui aux Frères Jacques et à Yves Montand leur poétique Page d’écriture, cette ode apologétique et onirique à l’inattention ? « L’oiseau-lyre joue et l’enfant chante et le professeur crie : ‘‘Quand vous aurez fini de faire le pitre !’’ Mais tous les autres enfants écoutent la musique et les murs de la classe s’écoulent tranquillement. Et les vitres redeviennent sable, l’encre redevient eau, les pupitres redeviennent arbres, la craie redevient falaise, le porte-plume redevient oiseau… » Dr Alain Cohen (psychiatre, Paris) Publié le 06/04/2012
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Concept
commenter cet article
6 avril 2012 5 06 /04 /avril /2012 13:06
Global Warming May Bring More Lyme Disease, Ticks Darren Collins doesn't know life without Lyme disease. He was just 11 months old when he came home from Wisconsin's Mauthe Lake Campground pasty white, lethargic and running a fever of 105. Darren's flu-like illness eventually subsided, but a host of other troubling Lyme-related symptoms -- stomachaches, irritability and concentration problems -- have since plagued the boy, now 10. "He's like Jekyll and Hyde," says his mom, Kristin. One moment Darren could be "happy and smiling," and the next in a "complete rage." "He scores perfect on a spelling test one week, then gets every word wrong the next week," adds Kristin, a nurse in Waukesha, Wisc. "He wants to know why he can't be like other kids." Darren Collins holds up a flag with the names of another family afflicted by Lyme. Sisters, Sophie and Stephanie, frequent his chat room; both were too sick to participate in the fundraiser walk. For now, Darren is settling for finding kids like himself, a group that has grown significantly over the decade since he contracted the disease from a tick bite. And according to experts, there may be a link between these increases and a changing climate. A quarter of all Lyme disease cases are among children. At highest risk: kids ages 5 to 14, who are more likely to play outdoors and close to the ground, where ticks are ready to pounce. Darren recently launched an online chat room catering to this group. Every Friday night at 8 p.m. Central, he now talks online with nearly a dozen new friends who log on from as far away as Kentucky and Australia, all living with Lyme. Overall numbers are on the rise, too. From 2005 to 2010, the number of Wisconsinites contracting Lyme each year jumped from 26 to 44 of every 100,000 people. Around 15,000 cases nationwide were reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the mid-1990s. That number is now 30,000 to 40,000, although the CDC admits it could be as much as 12 times higher. Lyme is just one of a lengthening list of emerging infectious diseases that are soaring in North America. Experts say that increasing temperatures and altered precipitation patterns that accompany climate change are already playing at least a partial role in the spread and intensity of zoonoses -- infectious agents that begin in animals and account for an estimated 75 percent of all newly emerging diseases. Cases of West Nile virus reported to the CDC, for example, rose from 21 in 2000 -- a year after its arrival in New York City -- to more than 1,000 in 2010. Like Lyme disease, most zoonoses require an intermediary tick, mosquito or other insect to transfer the virus or bacterium from an animal to a human. Because insects are cold-blooded, they are highly sensitive to outside conditions: A few degrees or inches of rain can significantly enhance or hamper their ability to survive, reproduce and effectively pass on a parasite. "There are lots of factors that contribute," says Ben Beard, a climate change expert with the CDC, highlighting the influence of international travel, wildlife management and the suburban lifestyle on emerging infectious diseases. "But climate disruption and change clearly have an impact." OF MICE AND MEN ... AND ACORNS For more than 20 years, Rick Ostfeld has been studying small mammals, ticks and tree seeds, trying to untangle some of the complex interrelationships that give rise to Lyme disease. Sure enough, he's found that acorns provide a wonderful winter food supply for white-footed mice, which in turn are a favorite meal of blood-thirsty black-legged ticks. "Acorn abundance gives rodents a jumpstart on breeding," says Ostfeld, an ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, N.Y. "By the next summer, mice numbers are through the roof." Scientists are unsure what causes spikes in acorn production, although studies suggest that plants produce more seeds with warmer temperatures and higher levels of carbon dioxide. "Long term, we can probably expect to see more tree seed production, including acorns," says Ostfeld. "That would influence how frequently we get these terribly risky years." The unprecedented acorn crop across the Northeast and mid-Atlantic spurred a mouse boom in 2010, and subsequent low acorn year in 2011, which Ostfeld anticipates will make for a "perfect storm" in 2012. Over the next couple months, as baby ticks wake up and look for a blood meal, there will be few mice to feast on. The next-best thing: humans. This year's mild winter may make matters even worse. Ostfeld says that it wouldn't surprise him if Lyme-carrying ticks come out as early as this month. Kristin's husband plucked a tick off himself just last week. Dr. Jared Zelman, an emergency room doctor at Sharon Hospital in Connecticut, has already seen cases, too. "Medical care providers in this region need to have their antennas very high," says Zelman, also a physician at two private schools in the area, long a hotbed for Lyme disease and other tick-borne infections. Warming temperatures may not only influence the intensity of tick transmission, but may also affect where ticks choose to live, according to Nick Ogden, a zoonoses expert with the Public Health Agency of Canada. While regions of the southern U.S. may actually turn inhospitable for ticks due to overly hot temperatures, other parts of North America may become newly suitable. A study published in March by Ogden and his colleagues suggests an area of eastern Canada habitable by ticks is expanding -- from an estimated 18 percent of the population affected in 2010 to more than 80 percent by 2020. Over the past 60 years, average annual temperatures in Canada have increased by 2.5 degrees Fahrenheit (1.4 degrees Celsius). "We've had a prediction of increasing risk, but now we're seeing it," says Ogden. Of course, Lyme isn't the only disease heading north. PROMISCUOUS POOPERS AND FLYING FEVERS Most kissing bugs in the U.S. "eat and run," says Lori Stevens, a biologist at the University of Vermont. Species of the creepy crawler in Central and South America, on the other hand, are known to take leisurely meals. "They poop while eating," Stevens says, adding that these species are also more likely to venture indoors. The blood-suckers get their name from their tendency to bite people around the mouth, usually at night. As a result, the bug's feces is more likely to make its way into its victim, often escorting the parasite that causes Chagas disease, a potentially life-threatening disease found mainly in Latin America. Infants and young children appear most susceptible, says Stevens, likely because they are less able to move and thwart bugs in their crib. Stevens and her colleagues have collected hundreds of kissing bugs from around the U.S. More than half, they've found, are infected with Chagas. Further, as they reported in a small study published in March, nearly 40 percent of bugs had fed on human blood. Chagas is a silent killer. Fewer than 10 percent of people infected have initial symptoms. It's usually not until 10 to 20 years later that the disease takes its toll -- on the heart. Not surprisingly, a connection between cardiovascular problems and a bug bite received decades prior is rarely made by patients or doctors. The CDC estimates 300,000 undiagnosed cases of Chagas in the U.S., many of which are in immigrants from Latin America. The American Red Cross now screens blood donations for the parasite. "We're pretty consistently finding Chagas in one percent of the Latin American population," says Dr. Sheba Meymandi, a Chagas expert in Los Angeles. Meymandi has seen two 17-year-old patients in the last year and a half with infections identified by blood donation screenings. One boy caught Chagas during a round of golf; the other while mountain biking. Neither teen was of Hispanic decent or had traveled outside the U.S. While these kind of outdoor infections continue to occur, the bigger concern is whether the more dangerous, domesticated kissing bug species of Central and South America is moving north. Because the insects vary in their preferred temperature and humidity, some researchers worry that climate change could help along the defecating-during-mealtime bugs. They have the same concerns about mosquitoes implicated in West Nile Virus, among other lesser-known zoonoses. Recent research in California found that hot temperatures predict greater West Nile transmission: The virus can both replicate and travel from the gut to the salivary glands faster with warmer weather, allowing a mosquito to start infecting people sooner, explains Aaron Brault, another zoonoses expert at the CDC. Rainfall is also critical. Heavy spring rains followed by a dry summer is the perfect formula for mosquitos' favorite breeding ground: stagnant pools of polluted water. Of increasing concern to the CDC is a mosquito recently arrived from overseas. The Asian tiger mosquito is particularly sensitive to climate and capable of transmitting not only West Nile, but also devastating diseases of the developing world, including dengue fever (already reported in Florida and Texas) and chikungunya. "It's only a matter of time," says the CDC's Beard. "We need to focus on what we can do about it now: surveillance, preparedness and prevention." 'BE VIGILANT' "When a disease occurs in a new area, we need to be quick to recognize and respond," Beard says. "The most important thing is to continue to invest at national, state and local levels." Several states and local governments have developed preparedness programs to address the spread of infectious diseases associated with climate change. But as The Huffington Post reported in February, federal funds for such surveillance and diagnosis measures are shrinking. John Brownstein, a pediatrician and researcher at Children's Hospital Boston, has been using climate change forecasts to project where Lyme might appear next. In 2005, he predicted the tick-borne diseases infiltration and spread in Canada that we are seeing today. With federal funding, he and his team are continuing to look at the effects of climate change on the distribution of a range of infectious diseases, including dengue. They're using what he calls "digital disease detection." The public can help by self-reporting diseases online or via a mobile application. Meanwhile, other researchers are discovering how surveillance and control of infections in dogs could go a long way in collaring both Lyme and Chagas. Rising risks also mean that "parents and pediatricians need to be vigilant," says Beard. In the case of Lyme, that might mean encouraging kids to wear insect repellent, tucking pants into socks, daily tick checks (for both people and pets), walking in the center of trails, avoiding bushy areas with high grass and showering after being outdoors. The CDC's website shares further suggestions, including how to create tick-free zones by putting playground equipment in the middle of the yard rather than on a forest fringe, where ticks thrive. "I hate to see people not let their kids play in the woods because of the threat," says the Cary Institute's Ostfeld. In addition to preventative measures, which he uses with his own kids, he notes the importance of being aware of Lyme disease symptoms: muscle aches, lethargy and fever outside of flu season. "Early treatment, when you suspect Lyme, is curative," Ostfeld says. Kristin Collins knows that if Darren had received a diagnosis and treatment early, spelling tests and simply being a kid would be easier for him today. Now, she is doing everything she can to keep other children and their families from suffering the same. As the vice president and medical liaison for the Wisconsin Lyme Network, she is handing out Lyme test kits "like candy," she says, while also advocating for the training of more doctors capable of diagnosing and treating the disease. "I know hundreds and hundreds of families dealing with this," says Collins. "It's heart-wrenching. It's scary. It's everywhere. Our kids are at a huge risk." Lynne Peeples | Apr 04, 2012 08:06 AM EDT
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article
6 avril 2012 5 06 /04 /avril /2012 11:17

« le séquençage du génome, une technique qui consiste à décortiquer notre ADN, ne permet pas de connaître à l'avance l'avenir médical de chaque individu, selon une étude américaine menée sur des jumeaux », (à l’occasion d'une conférence sur le cancer à Chicago).

 

 

L’un des coauteurs, le Dr Bert Vogelstein, professeur de cancérologie à la faculté de médecine de l'Université Johns Hopkins (Baltimore), a ainsi déclaré : 

« Nous ne pensons pas que les tests génomiques pourront remplacer les stratégies actuelles de prévention ».

« les chercheurs ont utilisé des données provenant de plus de 53.600 jumeaux identiques en Suède, en Finlande, au Danemark et en Norvège ainsi que du registre des jumeaux américains de la Seconde Guerre mondiale de l'Académie des sciences ».

« Ces dossiers contiennent également des informations sur 24 maladies (cancers, maladies auto-immunes, cardiovasculaires et neurologiques) dont ont pu souffrir ces frères et sœurs, leur fréquence et si un, deux ou aucun de des jumeaux les ont contractées ».

« les jumeaux n'ont pas forcément été victimes des mêmes pathologies. Les chercheurs ont même conclu que la plupart de ces personnes avaient chacune le même risque génétique d'être affectée par ces 24 maladies que le reste de la population ». 

« de nombreux facteurs génétiques, comportementaux et environnementaux influencent l'arrivée de nombre de maladies, telles que le cancer. Face à ces pathologies aux origines complexes, les médecins ont beaucoup de mal à distinguer la part de la génétique dans le développement de la maladie ».

« tout n'est pas perdu. Le séquençage des gènes reste un outil précieux pour prédire certaines pathologies comme la maladie d'Alzheimer ou le diabète de type 1 ».

En conclusion le Dr Vogelstein, a indiqué qu’« un bon dépistage, un diagnostic précoce et des stratégies de prévention comme le fait de ne pas fumer et de retirer chirurgicalement des tumeurs cancéreuses au début de leur développement sont les clés pour réduire la mortalité ».

Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Concept
commenter cet article
6 avril 2012 5 06 /04 /avril /2012 11:12

Une étude suggère qu’un gène non codant jusqu’ici inconnu pourrait contribuer au risque d’autisme. Il régule l’expression de la moesine, protéine connue pour affecter le développement cérébral.

 

Si des facteurs environnementaux contribuent au risque d’autisme, des facteurs génétiques jouent un rôle important. De rares mutations et des variations du nombre de copies ont été liées à l’autisme, mais pour la majorité des patients, les variants en cause restent inconnus.

Une précédente étude avait identifié une association hautement significative entre l’autisme et un variant SNP situé dans une région du chromosome 5 (5p14), région toutefois pauvre en gènes (« Nature », 2009). Daniel Campbell (Los Angeles) et son équipe ont cherché à savoir si cette association pouvait être due à un élément génétique fonctionnel. Ils ont effectivement découvert qu’un ARN non codant, jusqu’ici inconnu, est transcrit directement sous le signal d’association. Cet ARN est en fait l’antisens du pseudo-gène 1 de la moesine (MSNP1), et a donc été appelé MSNP1AS (pour Moesin Pseudogene 1, Antisense).

L’équipe montre en outre que l’ARN antisens MSNP1AS, situé sur le chromosome 5, se fixe à l’ARNm du vrai gène de la moesine (MSM), situé sur le chromosome X, et peut réguler les taux de moesine, une protéine impliquée dans le développement du cerveau (croissance axonale et formation des épines dendritiques), précédemment impliquée dans l’autisme.

Ainsi, il apparaît que l’ARN non codant MSNP1AS régule un gène de façon étonnamment complexe.

Enfin, les chercheurs ont analysé des échantillons de cerveau (cortex temporal) de sujets autistes décédés (n = 10), et ont constaté des taux douze fois plus élevés de MSNP1AS, comparés aux témoins (n = 10). Cette surexpression du MSNP1AS entraîne une baisse du taux de la protéine moesine dans des cellules humaines.

Alors que les taux de protéine moesine ont été trouvés normaux dans le cortex temporal post-mortem des sujets autistes, il est possible qu’à un moment crucial du développement cérébral, l’ARN antisens (ou élément génétique fonctionnel) provoque une dysrégulation de la moesine et diminue son taux, contribuant ainsi à l’autisme.

Des études dans des modèles animaux sont maintenant nécessaires pour déterminer l’effet de l’expression de MSNP1AS et du déficit en moesine sur le développement cérébral.

Dr VÉRONIQUE NGUYEN

Kerin et coll. Science Translational Medicine, 4 avril 2012

Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Concept
commenter cet article
6 avril 2012 5 06 /04 /avril /2012 07:36
Les psychiatres sont aujourd’hui à même de fonder une nouvelle clinique psychiatrique en tenant compte de cette grave mise en cause C’est L’APPEL DE BRUMATH (1 : la souffrance des familles) dans l’attente de ce proche mois de mai qui va rétablir une démocratie bafouée par la loi du 5-7-2011 instituant l’enfermement et l’obligation des soins pour les personnes présentant des troubles psychiques, ainsi traités comme des êtres inférieurs. (appel signé par divers acteurs de la psychiatrie réunis à Brumath le 29 mars 2012) Le fait est là, violent. Les familles de ces patients souffrent. Cette souffrance est lourde, indicible. L’annonce de ce trouble grave, psychose, autisme, entraine dans la famille concernée, un séisme prenant l’allure d’une « guerre civile », des accusations, inattendues déferlent entre les membres d’une même famille, la mettent en miettes. Soyons attentifs aux familles, à la confrontation à cette maladie de l’un des leurs, nous percevons que très vite la réaction la plus vive survient, mais celle-ci silencieuse, non exprimée directement : elle est faite d’« un sentiment de culpabilité inconscient» envers leur enfant. Certes chacun d’entre nous vit un tel sentiment lors de la perte d’un être cher, lors de la destruction d’un idéal auquel nous tenons. Mais cette auto accusation ici est plus sévère, car la mère, le père se sentent profondément atteints, mis en cause, ils constatent qu’ils n’ont pas su jouer le rôle que chaque parent assume comme étant son objectif essentiel. Ils n’ont pas su protéger de la maladie leur enfant devenu adulte. Certes nous avons aussi cette réaction à chaque fois qu’une maladie, une blessure, atteint notre enfant. Mais ici le trouble dont il s’agit est celui qui bouleverse le plus parce qu’il est le plus stigmatisé par la société. Récemment encore lors de ce drame de Toulouse nous avons été terrifiés de voir que la plupart des candidats au poste suprême ont dénoncé en premier lieu, avant tout autre, l’acte d’un fou, d’un dément ! D’autre part la survenue d’un trouble psychique grave évoque pour les parents un trouble de l’intelligence, de l’affect, deux qualités majeures, espérées chez leur enfant et qui devaient en faire l’être qui prolongerait leur vie dans une réussite sociale et humaine. Brutalement ils assistent à la faillite de cet idéal qui leur tenait le plus à cœur, « leur raison de vivre ». Seulement cette souffrance est plus grande encore ici, car ils sont confrontés à un deuil, mais ce deuil leur est impossible. Ils ont à faire le deuil d’un idéal portant sur leur enfant et en même temps ils ne peuvent faire le deuil de leur enfant. Il n’est pas mort. En plus ils perçoivent vite qu’il leur est demandé d’être assez forts pour imaginer tout ce qui pourra sauver cet enfant, il faut qu’ils fassent mieux que ce qu’ils ont déjà fait pour lui. C’est hors de leur portée. Ils vont donc accumuler les reproches qu’ils se font, leur sentiment de culpabilité en sera d’autant plus profond, plus violent. Ce sentiment s’accompagne aussitôt d’angoisse, l’ensemble se traduit par de l’agressivité soit vers eux-mêmes, soit vers les autres. On s’explique mieux la complexité du chemin qu’ils ont à parcourir avant de rencontrer des soignants de psychiatrie, culpabilité et peur de la folie les en écartent. Cette attente peut durer des années voir plus de dix ans, redoublant souffrance et culpabilité ! Tout ne se termine pas avec le début des soins ; au contraire un piège dont personne n’est responsable est tendu à la famille comme à l’équipe soignante, dès le début des soins, celui de la rivalité ; en effet dès qu’une famille confie son enfant si peu compréhensible à des soignants, elle va le sentir changer. Comment la famille ne pourrait être jalouse de voir d’autres personnes qu’elles obtenir de leur enfant un autre comportement, plus ouvert, plus présent ? Comment les soignants pourraient-ils s’empêcher d’être jaloux à leur tour de parents qui disent connaître mieux leur enfant qu’eux ? S’installe là un sentiment de rivalité inconscient chez les soignants redoublant aussi un sentiment de culpabilité inconscient chez eux devant les lenteurs des effets de leurs traitements institutionnels, les échecs plus ou moins passagers de leurs efforts. Mais face à cette rivalité une inégalité s’installe ; alors que les familles ne sont pas conscientes de ces différents sentiments, en souffrent et restent seules et sans recours, les soignants ayant perçu qu’ils ne savent prendre la bonne distance avec les patients déploient entre eux de nombreux outils pour trouver la bonne attitude : réunions diverses, supervisions, psychothérapie institutionnelle, qui les aident, mais laissent la famille seule face à leur souffrance, persuadés qu’ils n’ont pas à s’occuper d’elle puisqu’elle n’est pas malade. Cette souffrance des soignants qui s’installe mérite d’être reçue, si elle n’est pas reconnue, écoutée, elle va s’opposer au traitement des patients. Cela renforce le contraste avec les familles dont la souffrance n’est pas écoutée et amène à nous interroger sur l’hostilité des soignants. Cette hostilité n’est pas nouvelle, elle existe depuis le début de la psychiatrie et de ses asiles en 1838. La séparation du malade de sa famille a été érigée en dogme tant par crainte de contagion que parce que la famille était reconnue comme responsable, ce dogme n’a pas encore été totalement récusé. La psychiatrie moderne d’après guerre n’a pas donné de place à la famille : la psychiatrie institutionnelle ne s’est pas intéressée à la famille, certains psychanalystes l’ont même violemment caricaturée, la thérapie familiale par son titre même a fait croire qu’il fallait traiter la famille ce qui signifiait que la famille était malade et responsable des troubles de leurs enfants. Même la révolution amenée par la psychiatrie de secteur à partir de 1960, tout en invitant à intégrer l’environnement social du patient, a, dans sa majorité, négligé la famille. Au total à cette révolution, qui a fait faire un pas considérable à la psychiatrie en 60 ans, la famille n’a pas été invitée ! La solidarité sociale tant attendue dans le projet de secteur par Lucien Bonnafé et vécue dans la Résistance n’incluait pas la famille. Simultanément dès 1962 des familles ont puisé dans cette souffrance le courage pour dépasser leur honte face à une société hostile à la folie et se rassembler dans un mouvement national l’UNAFAM, demandant une psychiatrie différente de celle de l’asile. Puis, jusqu’à aujourd’hui, elles témoignent régulièrement que la majorité des soignants (en fait surtout les psychiatres, car les infirmiers se sont toujours montrés disponibles et attentifs) refusent de les voir sous le prétexte de manque de temps, et de ne pas vouloir rompre leur loyauté envers le malade ; parler aux familles étant à leurs yeux donner raison à celles-ci dans le conflit les opposant à leur malade (en fait un tel conflit existe toujours et n’est pas la cause du trouble, il est le compagnon de la maturation). Et même, si le climat général a quelque peu changé ces dernières années sous l’influence de la loi 2005 sur le handicap (loi apportant la compensation sociale dont les patients ont besoin à côté des soins, et invitant la continuité entre soins et action sociale) sous la pression des familles UNAFAM et des usagers FNAPSY, malgré cela dans la majorité des équipes le refus de recevoir les familles, ou le moins possible, a persisté. Alors soyons incisifs et demandons si, jusqu’à preuve du contraire, l’attitude indifférente des équipes de soin envers la souffrance des familles ne correspond pas à « un sentiment inconscient d’accusation » envers les familles ? (Pourquoi ne pas s’exprimer ainsi !). Il serait temps que les soignants s’interrogent. Les psychiatres se défendent de porter toute accusation envers les familles ? Peut-être est-ce vrai pour beaucoup, mais dans la mesure où ils ne font rien pour aider les familles à dépasser leur sentiment de culpabilité inconscient, ne pouvons-nous conclure qu’ils soutiennent cette accusation par leur silence ? En fait soyons attentifs ce propos ne reflète pas ‘toute’ la réalité ! Si ce constat peut être fait pour une grande partie de la psychiatrie dite générale (pour les adultes) c’est faux pour un quart de la psychiatrie, celle qui s’adresse aux enfants et aux adolescents. Dès le début cette psychiatrie qui en 1972 n’existait pas s’est bâtie sur le tissu naturel de la ville, du quartier, du village, et a abouti en dix ans à la création hors hôpital de 320 équipes (une pour deux ou trois des 837 secteurs adultes) ; sur toute la France une pratique s’est développée à partir du constat qu’il était impossible de soigner un enfant sans apporter à ses parents les éléments leur permettant de comprendre et d’accepter qu’un changement psychique était en cours chez leur enfant et qu’il était essentiel que leur propre attitude change envers eux ; entendant que ce changement s’opérait sous l’effet de traitements multiples associés (psychothérapie, institutionnel, chimie, éducation, pédagogie), où la psychothérapie jouait le rôle clé (inspirée surtout par la psychanalyse), donnant accès à une ‘mutation psychique’ chez leur enfant. Cette évolution due au traitement, associé au suivi des parents, a été possible grâce à la créativité et l’énergie de quelques psychiatres fondateurs Lebovici, Diatkine, Soulé, Lang, …et le rôle de coordonnateur de l’enseignement joué par Misès et d’autres, … diffusant cette nécessité de construire les soins sur ces liaisons avec les familles ainsi rétablies dans leur rôle fondamental de ‘parents’, et en lien avec les autres institutions civiles, école, pédiatrie, PMI, justice. A l’inverse les équipes de psychiatrie adulte étant engagées dans tout autre défi redoutable, celui de rendre humain les espaces asilaires, ont été, la plupart du temps, dévorées par l’énergie dépensée dans la lutte contre la persistance de l’hospitalisation sous contrainte ; non seulement elles ont été indifférentes aux familles, mais elles les ont jugées inopportunes dans les espaces hospitaliers, ce qui était facilité par le dogme évoqué de la séparation, non remis en cause. Certes beaucoup, mais de façon variable, en fonction de la qualité de leurs directeurs à même ou non de soutenir la dimension humaniste de la psychiatrie de secteur, ont développé parallèlement des soins variés dans la Cité, mais en restant enfermés dans leur rôle de psychiatres institutionnels et sans s’engager frontalement dans un échange constant avec la famille, c’est à dire sans s’interroger sur la qualité de liaison qu’il s’agit d’établir concrètement avec le reste de la société, et d’abord avec la famille. C’est la qualité de cette liaison avec la famille qui ouvre le dialogue avec la société. La psychiatrie peut alors se développer totalement en dehors des grands espaces hospitaliers, même les lits, et située ainsi, être à portée de voix des familles, autour du patient, tout en sachant qu’aucun patient ne peut aller vers la guérison si quelqu’un cherche à substituer son désir au sien que ce soit sa famille, son soignant ou un tiers. L’APPEL DE BRUMATH serait ce réveil appelant à fonder une nouvelle clinique psychiatrique donnant une vraie place aux familles, mais une place discrète, gardant la priorité au patient. « La psychiatrie, jamais sans la famille, mais avec discrétion. » La psychiatrie peut-elle avancer aujourd’hui si au préalable, elle ne convoque les raisons qui ont construit la stigmatisation de la folie, de la psychiatrie ? … (la famille, ce groupe d’origine, puis d’adoption, qui entoure la personne, et où chacun a son statut, mère, père, conjoint, sœur, oncle, grand-mère…) L’APPEL DE BRUMATH serait ce réveil appelant à fonder une nouvelle clinique psychiatrique donnant une vraie place aux familles, mais une place discrète, gardant la priorité au patient. « La psychiatrie, jamais sans la famille, mais avec discrétion. » La psychiatrie peut-elle avancer aujourd’hui si au préalable, elle ne convoque les raisons qui ont construit la stigmatisation de la folie, de la psychiatrie ? Demain Appel de Brumath (2 : réponse des soignants du secteur) Edmond Perrier, Sarah Sananès, Philippe Amarilli, Yves Carraz, Guy Baillon, psychiatres, Alain Castera cadre sup de santé Signer auprès de « edmond.perrier@ch-epsan.fr »
Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Concept
commenter cet article