Overblog Suivre ce blog
Editer l'article Administration Créer mon blog
3 décembre 2011 6 03 /12 /décembre /2011 12:15
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) ameliorates Th17 autoimmunity via transcriptional modulation of interleukin-17A. Mol Cell Biol. 2011 Sep;31(17):3653-69. Epub 2011 Jul 11. Joshi S, Pantalena LC, Liu XK, Gaffen SL, Liu H, Rohowsky-Kochan C, Ichiyama K, Yoshimura A, Steinman L, Christakos S, Youssef S. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07103, USA. Abstract A new class of inflammatory CD4(+) T cells that produce interleukin-17 (IL-17) (termed Th17) has been identified, which plays a critical role in numerous inflammatory conditions and autoimmune diseases. The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], has a direct repressive effect on the expression of IL-17A in both human and mouse T cells. In vivo treatment of mice with ongoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE; a mouse model of multiple sclerosis) diminishes paralysis and progression of the disease and reduces IL-17A-secreting CD4(+) T cells in the periphery and central nervous system (CNS). The mechanism of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) repression of IL-17A expression was found to be transcriptional repression,mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Transcription assays, gel shifting, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays indicate that the negative effect of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on IL-17A involves blocking of nuclear factor for activated T cells (NFAT), recruitment of histone deacetylase (HDAC), sequestration of Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1) by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)/VDR, and a direct effect of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on induction of Foxp3. Our results describe novel mechanisms and new concepts with regard to vitamin D and the immune system and suggest therapeutic targets for the control of autoimmune diseases. Bradstreet on the Vitamin D issue http://drbradstreet.org/2011/04/16/continuing-our-discussion-of-the-vitamin-d-viral-persistence-and-gut-dysbiosis-model-of-autism/ Vitamin D: the alternative hypothesis. Autoimmun Rev. 2009 Jul;8(8):639-44. Epub 2009 Feb 12. Albert PJ, Proal AD, Marshall TG. Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. paa2013@med.cornell.edu Abstract Early studies on vitamin D showed promise that various forms of the “vitamin” may be protective against chronic disease, yet systematic reviews and longer-term studies have failed to confirm these findings. A number of studies have suggested that patients with autoimmune diagnoses are deficient in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-D) and that consuming greater quantities of vitamin D, which further elevates 25 D levels, alleviates autoimmune disease symptoms. Some years ago, molecular biology identified 25 D as a secosteroid. Secosteroids would typically be expected to depress inflammation, which is in line with the reports of symptomatic improvement. The simplistic first-order mass-action model used to guide the early vitamin studies is now giving way to a more complex description of action. When active, the Vitamin D nuclear receptor (VDR) affects transcription of at least 913 genes and impacts processes ranging from calcium metabolism to expression of key antimicrobial peptides. Additionally, recent research on the Human Microbiome shows that bacteria are far more pervasive than previously thought, increasing the possibility that autoimmune disease is bacterial in origin. Emerging molecular evidence suggests that symptomatic improvements among those administered vitamin D is the result of 25-D’s ability to temper bacterial-induced inflammation by slowing VDR activity. While this results in short-term palliation, persistent pathogens that may influence disease progression, proliferate over the long-term. I will post more on this soon as I develop this line of reasoning. But Vitamin D is only part of the issue and there are cofactors we will need to discuss to make sense of this subject.

Partager cet article

Repost 0
Published by Chronimed - dans Infections froides
commenter cet article

commentaires